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Diversity and common themes in the organization of ocelli in Hymenoptera, Odonata and Diptera

Ribi, Willi A.; Zeil, Jochen

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We show in a comparative analysis that distinct retinal specializations in insect ocelli are much more common than previously realized and that the rhabdom organization of ocellar photoreceptors is extremely diverse. Hymenoptera, Odonata and Diptera show prominent equatorial fovea-like indentations of the ocellar retinae, where distal receptor endings are furthest removed from the lens surface and receptor densities are highest. In contrast, rhabdomere arrangements are very diverse across...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorRibi, Willi A.
dc.contributor.authorZeil, Jochen
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-21T05:06:59Z
dc.identifier.issn0340-7594
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/162753
dc.description.abstractWe show in a comparative analysis that distinct retinal specializations in insect ocelli are much more common than previously realized and that the rhabdom organization of ocellar photoreceptors is extremely diverse. Hymenoptera, Odonata and Diptera show prominent equatorial fovea-like indentations of the ocellar retinae, where distal receptor endings are furthest removed from the lens surface and receptor densities are highest. In contrast, rhabdomere arrangements are very diverse across insect groups: in Hymenoptera, with some exceptions, pairs of ocellar retinular cells form sheet-like rhabdoms that form elongated rectangular shapes in cross-section, with highly aligned microvilli directions perpendicular to the long axis of cross-sections. This arrangement makes most ocellar retinular cells in Hymenoptera sensitive to the direction of polarized light. In dragonflies, triplets of retinular cells form a y-shaped fused rhabdom with microvilli directions oriented at 60° to each other. In Dipteran ocellar retinular cells microvilli directions are randomised, which destroys polarization sensitivity. We suggest that the differences in ocellar organization between insect groups may reflect the different head attitude control systems that have evolved in these insect groups, but possibly also differences in the mode of locomotion and in the need for celestial compass information.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rights© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018
dc.sourceJournal of Comparative Physiology A: Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
dc.titleDiversity and common themes in the organization of ocelli in Hymenoptera, Odonata and Diptera
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume204
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor060801 - Animal Behaviour
local.identifier.absfor060805 - Animal Neurobiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB1756
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationRibi, Willi A., College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationZeil, Jochen, College of Science, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s00359-018-1258-0
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2019-03-12T07:42:56Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85044473148
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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