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Identifying predictors of postoperative persistent pain in women with breast cancer: assessments of investigative tools

Hashim, Che Gon

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Persistent pain after surgery in breast cancer has a significant impact on the patient’s survival. The value of escalating research on breast cancer in Malaysia cannot be underestimated. However, it is not known how many of these women experience persistent pain after surgery. This study surveyed previously unknown figures on prevalence, and explored the predictive factors of persistent pain women with breast cancer in Malaysia. There were three objectives....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHashim, Che Gon
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-20T05:08:02Z
dc.date.available2019-05-20T05:08:02Z
dc.identifier.otherb59285783
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/162744
dc.description.abstractPersistent pain after surgery in breast cancer has a significant impact on the patient’s survival. The value of escalating research on breast cancer in Malaysia cannot be underestimated. However, it is not known how many of these women experience persistent pain after surgery. This study surveyed previously unknown figures on prevalence, and explored the predictive factors of persistent pain women with breast cancer in Malaysia. There were three objectives. First, to assess the reliability of the already established investigative tools, namely, the Brief Pain Inventory, Distress Thermometer, and Resilience scale RS-14; second, to survey the prevalence of persistent pain; and thirdly to identify predictors of persistent pain in women after breast surgery, using the above measures. A test and retest design with no intervention and a recall period of 3 to 7 days was employed for assessment of the investigative tools. A cross-sectional study, with a prospective, correlational design, a retrospective review of medical records was used to identify predictors of persistent pain. These investigations were conducted in two phases –Section A and Section B – using separate data sets, with different inclusion and exclusion criteria. Participants were recruited from the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia. Descriptive statistics, a stepwise regression model for reliability testing, Cronbach alpha, and factor analysis were used. This study divided pain into categories 0 = no pain, 1–4 = mild pain, 5–6 = moderate pain, and 7–10 = severe pain. Section A: The tools were found reliable. Section B: A total of 123 participants were recruited; 119 participants remained because 4 of them did not meet the inclusion criteria. A total of 43% of the participants had persistent pain (n = 51). Pain interfered with their work, mood, and sleep. Based on a “Yes” answer for pain today (n = 51), data were analysed to determine predictors. The results revealed three predictors: distress, B = –.911, resilience, B = –.444, and pain interference, B = .309. The model was statistically significant, F (3, 41, 44) = 13.827, R2 = 0.267, .381, .467), and adjusted R2 = .250, .351, .467, p = 0.001. Significant P value ≤ .005. Pain prevalence was 43% in this Malaysian population. This study provided empirical evidence which is an important new knowledge to health care systems, health care providers, policy makers, and future research. The impact of persistent pain on work, mood, and sleep are justifiable medical concerns. The results obtained and identified predictors are catalysts for providing extra support for breast cancer women after surgery. Ideally, all women with breast cancer should have very good life satisfaction.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.subjectAIHW - Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
dc.subjectAJCC - A Joint American Committee on Cancer
dc.subjectANU - The Australian National University
dc.subjectALND - Axillary Lymph Node Dissection
dc.subjectBMI - Body Mass Index
dc.subjectBPI - Brief Pain Inventory
dc.subjectCAM - Complementary Alternative Medicine
dc.subjectCFA - Confirmatory Factor Analysis
dc.subjectCITC - Corrected Item-total Correlation
dc.subjectCOMT - Catechol-O-methyltransferase
dc.subjectCOX-2 inhibitor
dc.subjectDHEA - Dehydroepiandroterone
dc.subjectDT - Distress Thermometer
dc.subjectDV - Dependent Variable
dc.subjectFA - Factor analysis
dc.subjectIAPS - International Association for the Study of Pain
dc.subjectICC - Interclass Correlation Coefficient
dc.subjectIV - Independent Variable
dc.subjectKMO - Keiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy
dc.subjectNCCN - National Comprehensive Cancer Network
dc.subjectNPY - Neuropeptide Y
dc.subjectNRS - Numerical Rating Scale
dc.subjectNSAIDS - Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs
dc.subjectOCCAM - Office of Cancer of Complementary and Alternative Medicine
dc.subjectPCA - Principle Component Analysis
dc.subjectP-P plots - Probability-Probability plots
dc.subjectPTSD - Post-traumatic Stress disorder
dc.subjectRMSEA - Root Mean Square Error of Approximation
dc.subjectRS-14 - Resilience scale RS-14
dc.subjectRSA - Resilience Scale for Adult
dc.subjectSD - Standard Deviation
dc.subjectTENS - Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation
dc.subjectTOUS - Theory of Unpleasant Symptoms
dc.subjectUM - University of Malaya
dc.subjectUMMC - University of Malaya Medical Centre
dc.subjectVRS - Verbal Rating Scale
dc.subjectWHO - World Health Organisation
dc.titleIdentifying predictors of postoperative persistent pain in women with breast cancer: assessments of investigative tools
dc.typeThesis (MPhil)
local.contributor.supervisorYip, Desmond
local.contributor.supervisorcontactdesmond.yip@anu.edu.au
dcterms.valid2018
local.description.notesthe author deposited 20/05/2019
local.type.degreeMaster of Philosophy (MPhil)
dc.date.issued2018
local.contributor.affiliationANU Medical School, ANU College of Health and Medicine, The Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5ce28275ba0f3
local.mintdoimint
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