Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Vegecultures and the social-biological transformations of plants and people

Barton, Huw; Denham, Timothy

Description

The social entanglements of vegetative reproduction are considered for three neighbouring tropical regions that are often considered to exhibit very different histories of plant exploitation during the Holocene: early and independent agricultural development on New Guinea; introduction of agriculture to Island Southeast Asia during the last 3000-4000 years; and, Australia as the 'hunter-gatherer' continent. Following recent reassessments that emphasise the commonalities of many plant...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBarton, Huw
dc.contributor.authorDenham, Timothy
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-17T06:45:27Z
dc.identifier.issn1040-6182
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/160400
dc.description.abstractThe social entanglements of vegetative reproduction are considered for three neighbouring tropical regions that are often considered to exhibit very different histories of plant exploitation during the Holocene: early and independent agricultural development on New Guinea; introduction of agriculture to Island Southeast Asia during the last 3000-4000 years; and, Australia as the 'hunter-gatherer' continent. Following recent reassessments that emphasise the commonalities of many plant exploitation practices across these three regions, the focus here is upon the shared vegetative disposition, or orientation, of people to plants. The intention is to provide insight on how people's awareness of the vegetative reproductive capacity of plants has been mutually constitutive for the production and reproduction of their social worlds, whether by groups ordinarily referred to as 'hunter-gatherer' or 'horticulturalist'.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by a British Academy/ACU Grant (RA11G0131) for International Collaboration and a British Academy Small Grant (RA11G0192)
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherEditions scientifique et medicales Elsevier SAS
dc.rights© 2016 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA
dc.sourceQuaternary International
dc.titleVegecultures and the social-biological transformations of plants and people
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume489
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor210102 - Archaeological Science
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4485658xPUB1602
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/en-au
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBarton, Huw, University of Leicester
local.contributor.affiliationDenham, Timothy, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage17
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage25
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.quaint.2016.06.031
local.identifier.absseo950599 - Understanding Past Societies not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2019-03-12T07:29:54Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84978863589
local.identifier.thomsonID000441520200003
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Barton_Vegecultures_and_the_2018.pdf2.34 MBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator