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From new paternalism to new imaginings of possibilities inAustralia, Canada and Aotearoa/New Zealand: Indigenous rights and recognition and the state in the neoliberal age

Howard-Wagner, Deirdre; Bargh, Maria; Altamirano-Jimenez, Isabel

Description

The election of Evo Morales as the first indigenous President of Bolivia in 2005 is widely credited to the Cochamba Water War (Spronk 2007: 8). The Cochamba Water War progressed from an indigenous movement and a specific issue to the creation of an indigenous political party and election of the first indigenous President. The Bolivian water war, the Puebla Panama Plan in Mexico, the Mackenzie Valley pipeline in Canada (Altamirano‐Jiménez 2004) and Māori resistance to the neoliberal...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHoward-Wagner, Deirdre
dc.contributor.authorBargh, Maria
dc.contributor.authorAltamirano-Jimenez, Isabel
dc.contributor.editorDeirdre Howard-Wagner
dc.contributor.editorMaria Bargh
dc.contributor.editorIsabel Altamirano-Jiménez
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-13T06:33:10Z
dc.date.available2019-04-13T06:33:10Z
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-7604-6220-8
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/159583
dc.description.abstractThe election of Evo Morales as the first indigenous President of Bolivia in 2005 is widely credited to the Cochamba Water War (Spronk 2007: 8). The Cochamba Water War progressed from an indigenous movement and a specific issue to the creation of an indigenous political party and election of the first indigenous President. The Bolivian water war, the Puebla Panama Plan in Mexico, the Mackenzie Valley pipeline in Canada (Altamirano‐Jiménez 2004) and Māori resistance to the neoliberal agenda from 1984 onwards (Bargh 2007: 26) inspired much theorising about indigenous people successfully contesting neoliberalism (AltamiranoJiménez 2004, Bargh 2007, Spronk 2007: 8, Postero 2007). Bargh and others, for example, documented not only ‘overt Māori resistance to neoliberal policies, but also more subtle stories of activities, which The neoliberal state, recognition and indigenous rights implicitly challenge neoliberal practices and assumptions by their support for other ways of living’ (Bargh 2007: 1). Scholars make visible the persistence of the colonial in the concrete and material conditions of everyday neoliberal governance and life (Howard-Wagner & Kelly 2011: 103). As Bargh (2007), Altamirano-Jiménez (2013), Howard-Wagner (2010b, 2015) and others note, indigenous categorisations of neoliberal practices as a form of colonisation relate to a concern that neoliberalism in its multiple forms poses a threat to indigenous ways of life. This scholarship also critically reflects on the reshaping of the relationship between the state and indigenous peoples under neoliberalism (Altamirano-Jiménez 2004, Bargh 2007, Howard-Wagner 2009). For example, it draws attention to the increasing intervention in the lives of indigenous peoples (Howard-Wagner 2007, 2009, 2010a, 2010b) and the dispossession of indigenous people through privatisation (Wolfe 2006, Howard-Wagner 2012, Altamirano-Jiménez 2013, Coulthard 2014). It does not, however, preclude agency, resistance and decolonisation. Interpretive micro-studies about indigenous peoples’ engagement with neoliberalism provide particular value. They tell us about actually existing neoliberalism in the context of intervention in the everyday lives of indigenous peoples, contests over rights, contests over policy and the complex decisions indigenous people are making about how to protect their rights and navigate diverse economies involving neoliberal policies and practices.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherANU Press
dc.relation.ispartofThe Neoliberal State, Recognition and Indigenous Rights: New paternalism to new imaginings
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.titleFrom new paternalism to new imaginings of possibilities inAustralia, Canada and Aotearoa/New Zealand: Indigenous rights and recognition and the state in the neoliberal age
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor160501 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Policy
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4019826xPUB1
local.type.statusMetadata only
local.contributor.affiliationHoward-Wagner, Deirdre, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBargh, Maria, School of Maori Studies, Victoria University of Wellington
local.contributor.affiliationAltamirano-Jimenez, Isabel, University of Alberta, Canada
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage42
local.identifier.doi10.22459/CAEPR40.07.2018.01
dc.date.updated2019-03-12T07:26:19Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationCanberra
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access via publisher website
CollectionsANU Press (1965-Present)

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