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A comparison of fuel hazard in recently burned and long-unburned forests and woodlands

Dixon, Kelly; Cary, Geoffrey; Worboys, Graeme; Seddon, Julian; Gibbons, Philip

Description

Fuel hazard is often assumed to increase with fuel age, or the time-since-fire. However, studies on fuel hazard in long-unburned forests are scarce.Wemeasured overall fuel hazard in Eucalyptus forests and woodlands in south-eastern Australia at 81 sites where time-since-fire spans 0.5 years to at least 96 years. Overall fuel hazard was higher in forests and woodlands burned 6–12 years previously than those unburned for at least 96 years. The probability of high, very high or extreme overall...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDixon, Kelly
dc.contributor.authorCary, Geoffrey
dc.contributor.authorWorboys, Graeme
dc.contributor.authorSeddon, Julian
dc.contributor.authorGibbons, Philip
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-10T12:34:39Z
dc.date.available2019-04-10T12:34:39Z
dc.identifier.issn1049-8001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/159475
dc.description.abstractFuel hazard is often assumed to increase with fuel age, or the time-since-fire. However, studies on fuel hazard in long-unburned forests are scarce.Wemeasured overall fuel hazard in Eucalyptus forests and woodlands in south-eastern Australia at 81 sites where time-since-fire spans 0.5 years to at least 96 years. Overall fuel hazard was higher in forests and woodlands burned 6–12 years previously than those unburned for at least 96 years. The probability of high, very high or extreme overall fuel hazard – which is an operational threshold considered to equate with almost no chance of wildfire suppression in severe fire-weather – was highest 0.5–12 years post-fire, and lowest where fire had not occurred for at least 96 years. Frequent burning can maintain forest understorey in an early successional ‘shrubby’ state, leading to higher overall fuel hazard than forests where a lack of fire is associated with the senescence of shrubs. Protecting long-unburned sites from fire and managing to transition a larger proportion of forest to a long-unburned state may benefit fuel-hazard management within these forests in the long-term.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.sourceInternational Journal of Wildland Fire
dc.titleA comparison of fuel hazard in recently burned and long-unburned forests and woodlands
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume27
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor050205 - Environmental Management
local.identifier.absfor050104 - Landscape Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu1055894xPUB121
local.type.statusMetadata only
local.contributor.affiliationDixon, Kelly, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCary, Geoffrey, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWorboys, Graeme, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSeddon, Julian, ACT Government
local.contributor.affiliationGibbons, Philip, College of Science, ANU
local.identifier.doi10.1071/WF18037
local.identifier.absseo960906 - Forest and Woodlands Land Management
dc.date.updated2019-03-12T07:24:20Z
dc.provenanceJournal: International Journal of Wildland Fire (ISSN: 1049-8001, ESSN: 1448-5516) RoMEO: This is a RoMEO green journal Paid OA: A paid open access option is available for this journal. Author's Pre-print: green tick author can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing) Author's Post-print: green tick author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) Publisher's Version/PDF: cross author cannot archive publisher's version/PDF
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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