Skip navigation
Skip navigation

The Insularity of Anglophone Philosophy: Quantitative Analyses

Schwitzgebel, Eric; Huang, Linus Ta-Lun; Higgins, Andrew; Gonzalez-Cabrera, Ivan

Description

We present evidence that mainstream Anglophone philosophy is insular in the sense that participants in this academic tradition tend mostly to cite or interact with other participants in this academic tradition, while having little academic interaction with philosophers writing in other languages. Among our evidence: In a sample of articles from elite Anglophone philosophy journals, 97% of citations are citations of work originally written in English; 96% of members of editorial boards of elite...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSchwitzgebel, Eric
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Linus Ta-Lun
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez-Cabrera, Ivan
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-08T12:32:03Z
dc.identifier.issn0556-8641
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/159357
dc.description.abstractWe present evidence that mainstream Anglophone philosophy is insular in the sense that participants in this academic tradition tend mostly to cite or interact with other participants in this academic tradition, while having little academic interaction with philosophers writing in other languages. Among our evidence: In a sample of articles from elite Anglophone philosophy journals, 97% of citations are citations of work originally written in English; 96% of members of editorial boards of elite Anglophone philosophy journals are housed in majority-Anglophone countries; and only one of the 100 most-cited recent authors in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy spent most of his career in non-Anglophone countries writing primarily in a language other than English. In contrast, philosophy articles published in elite Chinese-language and Spanish-language journals cite from a range of linguistic traditions, as do non-English-language articles in a convenience sample of established European-language journals. We also find evidence that work in English has more influence on work in other languages than vice versa and that when non-Anglophone philosophers cite recent work outside of their own linguistic tradition it tends to be work in English.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherRhodes University
dc.sourcePhilosophical Papers
dc.titleThe Insularity of Anglophone Philosophy: Quantitative Analyses
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume47
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor220319 - Social Philosophy
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB9804
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSchwitzgebel, Eric, University of California at Riverside
local.contributor.affiliationHuang, Linus Ta-Lun, Academia Sinica, Taiwan
local.contributor.affiliationHiggins, Andrew, Illinois State University
local.contributor.affiliationGonzalez-Cabrera, Ivan, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2039-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.identifier.doi10.1080/05568641.2018.1429741
local.identifier.absseo970122 - Expanding Knowledge in Philosophy and Religious Studies
dc.date.updated2019-03-12T07:22:16Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85046030450
dc.provenanceJournal: Philosophical Papers (ISSN: 0556-8641, ESSN: 1996-8523) RoMEO: This is a RoMEO green journal Author's Pre-print: green tick author can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing) Author's Post-print: green tick author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) Publisher's Version/PDF: cross author cannot archive publisher's version/PDF
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Schwitzgebel_The_Insularity_of_Anglophone_2018.pdf685.4 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  22 January 2019/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator