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Mortuary caves and the dammar trade in the Towuti-Routa region, Sulawesi, in an Island southeast Asian context

Bulbeck, F David; Aziz, Fadhila Arifin; O'Connor, Susan; Calo, Ambra; Fenner, Jack; Marwick, Benjamin; Feathers, James K; Wood, Rachel; Prastiningtyas, Dyah

Description

Archaeological evidence from survey and cave excavation in the Towuti–Routa region of Sulawesi suggests the following sequence of late Holocene cultural change. Settled communities whose subsistence included an agricultural component had established themselves by the early centuries a.d. and began the use of caves for mortuary purposes. Extended inhumations are the oldest attested mortuary practice, overlapping in time with secondary burials in large earthenware jars dated to around a.d. 1000....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBulbeck, F David
dc.contributor.authorAziz, Fadhila Arifin
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Susan
dc.contributor.authorCalo, Ambra
dc.contributor.authorFenner, Jack
dc.contributor.authorMarwick, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorFeathers, James K
dc.contributor.authorWood, Rachel
dc.contributor.authorPrastiningtyas, Dyah
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-02T03:53:30Z
dc.date.available2019-04-02T03:53:30Z
dc.identifier.issn0066-8435
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/158148
dc.description.abstractArchaeological evidence from survey and cave excavation in the Towuti–Routa region of Sulawesi suggests the following sequence of late Holocene cultural change. Settled communities whose subsistence included an agricultural component had established themselves by the early centuries a.d. and began the use of caves for mortuary purposes. Extended inhumations are the oldest attested mortuary practice, overlapping in time with secondary burials in large earthenware jars dated to around a.d. 1000. The third, ethnohistorically described practice involved the surface disposal of the deceased, including the use of imported martavans for the elite, between approximately a.d. 1500 and 1900. This sequence of mortuary practices has not been documented elsewhere in Island Southeast Asia, although each practice has multiple parallels. The Towuti–Routa dammar trade, which was at its peak at the time of European contact, can perhaps account for the quantity of exotic items imported to the region but not the specifics of the mortuary practices.
dc.description.sponsorship“The Archaeology of Sulawesi: A Strategic Island for Understanding Modern Human Colonization and Interactions Across our Region” project was funded by the Australian Research Council (DP110101357).
dc.format.extent37 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Hawaii Press
dc.rights© 2016 by the University of Hawaii Press
dc.sourceAsian Perspectives
dc.subjectSulawesi archaeology
dc.subjectIsland Southeast Asia mortuary practices
dc.subjectSulawesi dammar trade
dc.subjectSoutheast Sulawesi
dc.titleMortuary caves and the dammar trade in the Towuti-Routa region, Sulawesi, in an Island southeast Asian context
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume55
dc.date.issued2016
local.identifier.absfor200202 - Asian Cultural Studies
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB4756
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBulbeck, F David, College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationAziz, Fadhila Arifin, National Research Centre of Archaeology
local.contributor.affiliationO'Connor, Susan, College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationCalo, Ambra, College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationFenner, Jack, College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationMarwick, Benjamin, College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationFeathers, James K, University of Washington
local.contributor.affiliationWood, Rachel, College of Science, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationPrastiningtyas, Dyah, Center for Prehistory and Austronesian Studies
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP110101357
local.identifier.essn1535-8283
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage148
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage183
local.identifier.doi10.1353/asi.2016.0017
dc.date.updated2019-03-12T07:20:23Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85009239910
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://sherpa.mimas.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0066-8435/Author can archive publisher's version/PDF (Sherpa/Romeo as of 2/4/2019)
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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