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Fluence, flux, and implantation temperature dependence of ion-implantation-induced defect production in 4H–SiC

Slotte, J.; Saarinen, K.; Janson, M. S.; Hallén, A.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Svensson, B. G.; Wong-Leung, J.; Jagadish, C.

Description

Vacancy-type defect production in Al- and Si-implanted 4H–SiC has been studied as a function of ion fluence, ion flux, and implantation temperature in the projected ion range region by positron annihilation spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering techniques. Ion channeling measurements show that the concentration of displaced silicon atoms increases rapidly with increasing ion fluence. In the ion fluence interval of 10¹³–10¹⁴cm¯² the positron annihilation parameters are roughly constant at a...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSlotte, J.
dc.contributor.authorSaarinen, K.
dc.contributor.authorJanson, M. S.
dc.contributor.authorHallén, A.
dc.contributor.authorKuznetsov, A. Yu.
dc.contributor.authorSvensson, B. G.
dc.contributor.authorWong-Leung, J.
dc.contributor.authorJagadish, C.
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-01T00:12:14Z
dc.date.available2015-10-01T00:12:14Z
dc.identifier.issn0021-8979
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/15740
dc.description.abstractVacancy-type defect production in Al- and Si-implanted 4H–SiC has been studied as a function of ion fluence, ion flux, and implantation temperature in the projected ion range region by positron annihilation spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering techniques. Ion channeling measurements show that the concentration of displaced silicon atoms increases rapidly with increasing ion fluence. In the ion fluence interval of 10¹³–10¹⁴cm¯² the positron annihilation parameters are roughly constant at a defect level tentatively associated with the divacancy VCVSi. Above the ion fluence of 10¹⁴cm¯² larger vacancy clusters are formed. For implantations as a function of ion flux (cm¯²s¯¹), ion channeling and positron annihilation measurements behave similarly, i.e., indicating increasing damage in the projected range region with increasing ion flux. However, for samples implanted at different temperatures the positron annihilation parameter S shows a clear minimum at approximately 100°C, whereas the normalized backscattering yield decrease continuously with increasing implantation temperature. This is explained by the formation of larger vacancy clusters when the implantation temperature is increased.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work has been supported partly by the Nordic Academy for Education and Research Training (NorFa) and the Swedish Foundation for International cooperation in Research and Higher Education (STINT).
dc.publisherAmerican Institute of Physics
dc.rightshttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0021-8979..."Publishers version/PDF may be used on author's personal website, institutional website or institutional repository" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 1/10/15). Copyright 2005 American Institute of Physics. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the American Institute of Physics. The following article appeared in Journal of Applied Physics and may be found at https://doi.org/10.1063/1.1844618
dc.sourceJournal of Applied Physics
dc.subjectKeywords: Implantation temperature; Ion channelling; Sublattices; Vacancy clusters; Annealing; Crystal lattices; Functions; Heat treatment; Mathematical models; Neutron irradiation; Positron annihilation spectroscopy; Positrons; Recrystallization (metallurgy); Ruth
dc.titleFluence, flux, and implantation temperature dependence of ion-implantation-induced defect production in 4H–SiC
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume97
dc.date.issued2005-01-06
local.identifier.absfor020405
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub10756
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.aip.org/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSlotte, J, Helsinki University of Technology, Finland
local.contributor.affiliationSaarinen, K, Helsinki University of Technology, Finland
local.contributor.affiliationJanson, M S, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden
local.contributor.affiliationHallen, A, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden
local.contributor.affiliationKuznetsov, A Yu, University of Oslo, Norway
local.contributor.affiliationSvensson, Bengt Gunnar, University of Oslo, Norway
local.contributor.affiliationWong-Leung, Yin-Yin (Jennifer), College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, CPMS Research School of Physics and Engineering, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationJagadish, Chennupati, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, CPMS Research School of Physics and Engineering, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, The Australian National University
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage033513
local.identifier.doi10.1063/1.1844618
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T11:10:10Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-13744258288
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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