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Finding the one: optimal choosiness under sequential mate choice

Henshaw, Jonathan

Description

When mates are encountered sequentially, each encounter involves a decision whether to reject the current suitor and risk not finding a better mate, or to accept them despite their flaws. I provide a flexible framework for modelling optimal choosiness when mate encounters occur unpredictably in time. The model allows for temporal variation in the fitness benefits of mating, including seasonal breeding conditions, accrual of mate search costs, survival of the choosing individual or senescence of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHenshaw, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-29T05:01:00Z
dc.identifier.issn1010-061X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/157385
dc.description.abstractWhen mates are encountered sequentially, each encounter involves a decision whether to reject the current suitor and risk not finding a better mate, or to accept them despite their flaws. I provide a flexible framework for modelling optimal choosiness when mate encounters occur unpredictably in time. The model allows for temporal variation in the fitness benefits of mating, including seasonal breeding conditions, accrual of mate search costs, survival of the choosing individual or senescence of gametes. The basic optimality framework can be applied iteratively to obtain mate choice equilibria in dynamically evolving populations. My model predicts that individuals should be choosier when the average rate of mate encounters is high, but that choosiness should decline over time as the likelihood of future mate encounters decreases. When mate encounters are uncertain, there is a trade-off between reproductive timing and mate choice (the 'when' and the 'who'). Mate choice may be selected against when reproductive timing is highly important (e.g. when breeding conditions show a narrow peak in time). This can even lead to step-shaped mate choice functions, where individuals abruptly switch from rejecting to accepting all suitors as peak breeding conditions approach. The model contributes to our understanding of why individuals may not express mate preferences, even when there is substantial variation in mate quality.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.rights© 2018 EUROPEAN SOCIETY FOR EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY.J. EVOL. BIOL.31(2018) 1193–12031193 JOURNAL OF EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY@2018 EUROPEAN SOCIETY FOR EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY
dc.sourceJournal of Evolutionary Biology
dc.titleFinding the one: optimal choosiness under sequential mate choice
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume31
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.absfor060201 - Behavioural Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB10497
local.publisher.urlhttp://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHenshaw, Jonathan, College of Science, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue8
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1193
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1203
local.identifier.doi10.1111/jeb.13296
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2019-03-12T07:19:48Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-85051054373
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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