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A World of Fiction: Digital Collections and the Future of Literary History

Bode, Katherine

Description

During the 19th century, throughout the Anglophone world, most fiction was first published in periodicals. In Australia, newspapers were not only the main source of periodical fiction, but the main source of fiction in general. Because of their importance as fiction publishers, and because they provided Australian readers with access to stories from around the world—from Britain, America and Australia, as well as Austria, Canada, France, Germany, New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, and ......[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBode, Katherine
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-26T04:03:25Z
dc.date.available2019-03-26T04:03:25Z
dc.identifier.isbn9780472130856
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/157320
dc.description.abstractDuring the 19th century, throughout the Anglophone world, most fiction was first published in periodicals. In Australia, newspapers were not only the main source of periodical fiction, but the main source of fiction in general. Because of their importance as fiction publishers, and because they provided Australian readers with access to stories from around the world—from Britain, America and Australia, as well as Austria, Canada, France, Germany, New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, and ... During the 19th century, throughout the Anglophone world, most fiction was first published in periodicals. In Australia, newspapers were not only the main source of periodical fiction, but the main source of fiction in general. Because of their importance as fiction publishers, and because they provided Australian readers with access to stories from around the world—from Britain, America and Australia, as well as Austria, Canada, France, Germany, New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, and beyond—Australian newspapers represent an important record of the transnational circulation and reception of fiction in this period. Investigating almost 10,000 works of fiction in the world's largest collection of mass-digitized historical newspapers (the National Library of Australia's Trove database), A World of Fiction reconceptualizes how fiction traveled globally, and was received and understood locally, in the 19th century. Katherine Bode's innovative approach to the new digital collections that are transforming research in the humanities are a model of how digital tools can transform how we understand digital collections and interpret literatures in the past.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project was funded by an Australian Research Council Discovery Grant, from 2013 to 2016.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherUniversity of Michigan Press
dc.rightsCopyright © 2018 by Katherine Bode
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/
dc.subjectLiterary Studies:Editorial Theory
dc.subjectLiterary Studies:19th Century Literature
dc.subjectDigital Projects
dc.subjectHistory:Intellectual History
dc.titleA World of Fiction: Digital Collections and the Future of Literary History
dc.typeBook
dc.rights.holderThis work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License.
dc.date.issued2018
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSchool of Literature Languages & Linguistics. Research School of Humanities & the Arts
local.identifier.doi10.3998/mpub.8784777
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access via publisher website
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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