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Revisiting the vanishing refuge model of diversification

Damasceno, Roberta; Strangas, Maria L.; Carnaval, Ana C.; Rodrigues, Miguel T.; Moritz, Craig

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Much of the debate around speciation and historical biogeography has focused on the role of stabilizing selection on the physiological (abiotic) niche, emphasizing how isolation and vicariance, when associated with niche conservatism, may drive tropical speciation. Yet, recent re-emphasis on the ecological dimensions of speciation points to a more prominent role of divergent selection in driving genetic, phenotypic, and niche divergence. The vanishing refuge model (VRM), first described by...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDamasceno, Roberta
dc.contributor.authorStrangas, Maria L.
dc.contributor.authorCarnaval, Ana C.
dc.contributor.authorRodrigues, Miguel T.
dc.contributor.authorMoritz, Craig
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-23T03:25:32Z
dc.date.available2015-09-23T03:25:32Z
dc.identifier.issn1664-8021
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/15664
dc.description.abstractMuch of the debate around speciation and historical biogeography has focused on the role of stabilizing selection on the physiological (abiotic) niche, emphasizing how isolation and vicariance, when associated with niche conservatism, may drive tropical speciation. Yet, recent re-emphasis on the ecological dimensions of speciation points to a more prominent role of divergent selection in driving genetic, phenotypic, and niche divergence. The vanishing refuge model (VRM), first described by Vanzolini and Williams (1981), describes a process of diversification through climate-driven habitat fragmentation and exposure to new environments, integrating both vicariance and divergent selection. This model suggests that dynamic climates and peripheral isolates can lead to genetic and functional (i.e., ecological and phenotypic) diversity, resulting in sister taxa that occupy contrasting habitats with abutting distributions. Here, we provide predictions for populations undergoing divergence according to the VRM that encompass habitat dynamics, phylogeography, and phenotypic differentiation across populations. Such integrative analyses can, in principle, differentiate the operation of the VRM from other speciation models. We applied these principles to a lizard species, Coleodactylus meridionalis, which was used to illustrate the model in the original paper. We incorporate data on inferred historic habitat dynamics, phylogeography and thermal physiology to test for divergence between coastal and inland populations in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. Environmental and genetic analyses are concordant with divergence through the VRM, yet physiological data are not. We emphasize the importance of multidisciplinary approaches to test this and alternative speciation models while seeking to explain the extraordinarily high genetic and phenotypic diversity of tropical biomes.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work profited from National Science Foundation awards to Ana C. Carnaval and Craig Moritz (DEB-817035, DEB-1035184, DEB- 1120487), an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to Maria L. Strangas, FAPESP grants to Miguel T. Rodrigues (2003/10335-8 and 2011/50146-6) and Australian Research Council support to Craig Moritz. Roberta Damasceno acknowledges support from FAPESP (2013/22477-3) and CAPES-Fulbright (BEX 2740/06-0). This work is partially co-funded by FAPESP (BIOTA, 2013/50297- 0), NSF (DOB 1343578), and NASA through the Dimensions of Biodiversity Program.
dc.format12 pages
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation
dc.rights© 2014 Damasceno, Strangas, Carnaval, Rodrigues and Moritz. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
dc.sourceFrontiers in Genetics
dc.subjectdiversification
dc.subjecthabitat stability
dc.subjectniche evolution
dc.subjectphenotypic evolution
dc.subjectspeciation
dc.subjectvanishing refuge model
dc.titleRevisiting the vanishing refuge model of diversification
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume5
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-09-21
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor060302
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB5105
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.frontiersin.org/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDamasceno, Roberta, University of California, United States of America
local.contributor.affiliationStrangas, Maria L., City University of New York, United States of America
local.contributor.affiliationCarnaval, Ana Carolina, City University of New York, United States of America
local.contributor.affiliationRodrigues, Miguel Trefaut, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil
local.contributor.affiliationMoritz, Craig, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, CMBE Research School of Biology, Division of Evolution, Ecology & Genetics, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1664-8021
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage353
local.identifier.doi10.3389/fgene.2014.00353
local.identifier.absseo970106
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T09:23:47Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84917742434
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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