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Systemic and local responses to repeated HL stress-induced retrograde signaling in Arabidopsis

Gordon, Matthew J.; Carmody, Melanie; Albrecht, Verónica; Pogson, Barry

Description

Chloroplasts of leaves under high light stress initiate signals to the nuclei of both exposed and distal leaves in order to acclimate against the potential threat of oxidative damage: a process known as high light systemic acquired acclimation (HL SAA). This study explores the nature of HL SAA, synergistic interactions with other environmental stresses, and the impact of repeated HL stress on the acclimation response of exposed and distal leaves. This necessitated the development of novel...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGordon, Matthew J.
dc.contributor.authorCarmody, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorAlbrecht, Verónica
dc.contributor.authorPogson, Barry
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-23T02:38:27Z
dc.date.available2015-09-23T02:38:27Z
dc.identifier.issn1664-462X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/15660
dc.description.abstractChloroplasts of leaves under high light stress initiate signals to the nuclei of both exposed and distal leaves in order to acclimate against the potential threat of oxidative damage: a process known as high light systemic acquired acclimation (HL SAA). This study explores the nature of HL SAA, synergistic interactions with other environmental stresses, and the impact of repeated HL stress on the acclimation response of exposed and distal leaves. This necessitated the development of novel experimental systems to investigate the initiation, perception, and response to HL SAA. These systems were used to investigate the HL SAA response by monitoring the induction of mRNA in distal leaves not exposed to the HL stress. Acclimation to HL is induced within minutes and the response is proportionally dependent on the quality and quantity of light. HL SAA treatments in conjunction with variations in temperature and humidity reveal HL SAA is influenced by fluctuations in humidity. These treatments also result in changes in auxin accumulation and auxin-responsive genes. A key question in retrograde signaling is the extent to which transient changes in light intensity result in a "memory" of the event leading to acclimation responses. Repeated exposure to short term HL resulted in acclimation of the exposed tissue and that of emerging and young leaves (but not older leaves) to HL and oxidative stress.
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation
dc.rights© 2013 Gordon, Carmody, Albrecht and Pogson. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and subject to any copyright notices concerning any third-party graphics etc.
dc.sourceFrontiers in Plant Science
dc.subjecthigh light
dc.subjectoxidative stress
dc.subjectphotoprotection
dc.subjectretrograde signaling
dc.subjectsystemic acquired acclimation
dc.titleSystemic and local responses to repeated HL stress-induced retrograde signaling in Arabidopsis
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume3
dcterms.dateAccepted2012-12-16
dc.date.issued2013-01-17
local.identifier.absfor060705
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4956746xPUB335
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.frontiersin.org/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationGordon, Matthew, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, CMBE Research School of Biology, Division of Plant Sciences, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationCarmody, Melanie, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, CMBE Research School of Biology, Division of Plant Sciences, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationAlbrecht, Veronica, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, CMBE Research School of Biology, Division of Plant Sciences, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationPogson, Barry, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, CMBE Research School of Biology, Division of Plant Sciences, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1664-462X
local.bibliographicCitation.issueArticle 303
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage303
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage20
local.identifier.doi10.3389/fpls.2012.00303
local.identifier.absseo970106
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T10:14:20Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84882324065
local.identifier.thomsonID000329470800001
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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