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Historical institutionalism in world politics : prospects for democratisation

Kuyper, Jonathan

Description

How can democratisation best be pursued and promoted in the existing global system? Most proposals to ameliorate the global democratic deficit are conceptualised as ideal end-points which should be approximated as closely as possible. However, because there is an ineliminable gap between ideal conception and non-ideal institutionalisation, designers should redirect focus toward the transformative pathway. Institutional designers and policymakers thus require foreknowledge about how institutions...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorKuyper, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-18T23:45:19Z
dc.date.available2019-02-18T23:45:19Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.identifier.otherb3126513
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/156317
dc.description.abstractHow can democratisation best be pursued and promoted in the existing global system? Most proposals to ameliorate the global democratic deficit are conceptualised as ideal end-points which should be approximated as closely as possible. However, because there is an ineliminable gap between ideal conception and non-ideal institutionalisation, designers should redirect focus toward the transformative pathway. Institutional designers and policymakers thus require foreknowledge about how institutions may evolve through time. I contend that historical institutionalism - well-placed as it is to incorporate rationalist and sociological insights - can be recalibrated to think through these future pathways. I argue that the structure, sequence, and setting of a proposal all shed light on how institutions may change and the wider effects design might entail. The task for institutional designers then is to determine whether a transformative pathway can feasibly promote democratic values. I reconceptualise global democracy as an on-going process of democratisation promoted by the attainment of three values: equal participation, accountability, and institutional revisability. The thesis engages in comparative analysis of three ideal-typical proposals for global democratisation: federalism (world government), cosmopolitan democracy (piecemeal constitutionalism), and democratic polycentrism (global civil society). Having analysed these approaches, I argue that federalist models -which seek to replicate familiar statist institutions at the global level - would have difficulty inducing the democratising effects sought by proponents. Similarly, cosmopolitan democratic institutions would likely limit future experimentation through path-dependent feedback. While the deliberative base of global civil society offers a more fruitful way to think about global democratisation, it is difficult to envisage how this approach meets a fundamental equality condition of democratic participation. Building on the comparative analysis, I contend that regime complexes are the appropriate unit of democratisation beyond the state. Because each issue area in world politics is different, we require tailor-made (as opposed to one-size-fits-all) solutions. Through a discussion of the intellectual property rights regime complex, I contend that democratisation can be sought on two planes: horizontal deliberative accountability within multilateral negotiations; and the vertical development of deliberative democratic experimentalism. I apply my historical-institutionalist framework to expound both normative and institutional benefits of this prescription.
dc.format.extent299 leaves.
dc.subject.lccJC423.K87 2012
dc.subject.lcshDemocratization
dc.subject.lcshDemocracy
dc.subject.lcshGlobalization
dc.subject.lcshInternational relations
dc.subject.lcshCivil society International cooperation
dc.titleHistorical institutionalism in world politics : prospects for democratisation
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.description.notesThesis (Ph.D.)--Australian National University, 2012
dc.date.issued2012
local.contributor.affiliationAustralian National University.
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d5141c0bbff2
dc.date.updated2019-01-10T08:20:21Z
local.mintdoimint
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