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Spatial models for the quantification of ecosystem services across the Australian capital region

Porfirio, Luciana Laura

Description

The recognition that human life depends on services provided by ecosystems has given rise to the field of ecosystem services. The main goal of the thesis is to develop a robust methodology for investigating how human interventions in the landscape affect ecosystem services, using as a case study the Australian Capital Region. The methods, which are based on remote sensing, spatial environmental modelling and geographic information systems, address the measurement, modelling and mapping of a...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPorfirio, Luciana Laura
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-18T23:44:27Z
dc.date.available2019-02-18T23:44:27Z
dc.date.copyright2013
dc.identifier.otherb3482882
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/155974
dc.description.abstractThe recognition that human life depends on services provided by ecosystems has given rise to the field of ecosystem services. The main goal of the thesis is to develop a robust methodology for investigating how human interventions in the landscape affect ecosystem services, using as a case study the Australian Capital Region. The methods, which are based on remote sensing, spatial environmental modelling and geographic information systems, address the measurement, modelling and mapping of a comprehensive set of ecosystem services associated with major land cover types and land uses. These analyses are used to explore the synergies and trade-offs between these services across the Australian Capital Region. This thesis is structured in three sections. The first section introduces the aim and scope of the thesis; defines the concept of ecosystem services and its role as a communication tool for scientists, policy makers and stakeholders and describes the methods used by the thesis. The second section presents a land use and land cover classification for the Australian Capital Region. This classification underpins the quantification and mapping of five key ecosystem services in the remainder of the second section. These ecosystem services are: (i) carbon flows and storage; (ii) provision of food; (iii) biodiversity richness; (iv) water quality; and (v) recreation and ecotourism. The third section analyses the impacts of a hypothetical land use change scenario in which food production in the region is increased to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions associated with the importation of food - the so-called 'carbon miles' associated with the transport of food into the region from other parts of Australia and the world. The analysis assesses not only the impact on carbon stored in the region, but also the impact on other ecosystem services. The analysis also identifies what parts of the Australian Capital Region are most affected under the scenario outcomes. The thesis concludes with the key outcomes of this study. The methods presented in this thesis demonstrate that remote sensing, spatial environmental modelling and geographic information system are cost-effective tools to study and quantify ecosystem services at a regional scale. The results of this thesis could help in the promotion of sustainability in landscape and conservation planning.
dc.format.extentxiii, 189 leaves.
dc.subject.lcshEcosystem services Australia Australian Capital Territory
dc.subject.lcshLand use ClassificationAustralia Australian Capital Territory
dc.subject.lcshEcosystem management Simulation methods
dc.subject.lcshEcosystem management Remote sensing
dc.subject.lcshGeographic information systems
dc.titleSpatial models for the quantification of ecosystem services across the Australian capital region
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.description.notesThesis (Ph.D.) Australian National University, 2013.
dc.date.issued2013
local.contributor.affiliationAustralian National University.
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d515199c740e
dc.date.updated2019-01-10T01:57:25Z
local.mintdoimint
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