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A brief intervention to increase uptake and adherence of an online program for depression and anxiety: Protocol for the Enhancing Engagement with Psychosocial Interventions (EEPI) Randomized Controlled Trial

Batterham, Philip; Calear, Alison; Sunderland, Matthew; Kay-Lambkin, Frances; Farrer, Louise; Gulliver, Amelia

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BACKGROUND There is substantial evidence that psychosocial programs delivered online can be effective in treating and preventing mental health problems. However, use of evidence-based programs in the community is currently suboptimal, and there is a lack of evidence around how to increase engagement with existing evidence-based programs. Novel approaches to increasing the acceptability of online programs such as the use of brief engagement-facilitation interventions (EFI) require evaluation....[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBatterham, Philip
dc.contributor.authorCalear, Alison
dc.contributor.authorSunderland, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorKay-Lambkin, Frances
dc.contributor.authorFarrer, Louise
dc.contributor.authorGulliver, Amelia
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-08T05:38:33Z
dc.identifier.issn1551-7144
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/155610
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND There is substantial evidence that psychosocial programs delivered online can be effective in treating and preventing mental health problems. However, use of evidence-based programs in the community is currently suboptimal, and there is a lack of evidence around how to increase engagement with existing evidence-based programs. Novel approaches to increasing the acceptability of online programs such as the use of brief engagement-facilitation interventions (EFI) require evaluation. AIMS The aims of this study are to 1) examine the effectiveness of a brief online engagement-facilitation intervention (EFI) presented prior to an online self-help mental health program (myCompass) in improving uptake of and adherence to that program, and 2) assess if greater uptake and/or adherence are associated with improved efficacy (greater reduction in symptoms of depression and anxiety) relative to a control condition). METHODS A three-arm randomized controlled trial will be conducted (target sample: N = 693 participants recruited via social media). An active online cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) intervention will be delivered either with (arm 1) or without (arm 2) the EFI. An attention control group (arm 3) will enable testing of the relative efficacy of the iCBT intervention. Primary outcomes are uptake of the intervention (initiation) and adherence (module completion). RESULTS Findings will inform the more efficient dissemination of a range of psychosocial programs into the community, with potential for significant efficiency gains in treating common mental health problems. CONCLUSIONS Greater engagement with online psychosocial programs may lead to significant reductions in the burden of common mental health problems in the community. TRIAL REGISTRATION Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) ACTRN12618001565235.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Fund (NHMRC) grant (#1138713). The lead author can disseminate the results of this trial without the express permission of the funder. PB is supported by NHMRC Fellowship 1083311; ALC is supported by NHMRC Fellowship (#1122544); FK-L is supported by NHMRC Fellowship (#1110371).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2019 Elsevier Inc
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourceContemporary clinical trials
dc.subjectadherence
dc.subjectengagement-facilitation intervention
dc.subjectimplementation
dc.subjectinternet
dc.subjectmental health
dc.subjectuptake
dc.titleA brief intervention to increase uptake and adherence of an online program for depression and anxiety: Protocol for the Enhancing Engagement with Psychosocial Interventions (EEPI) Randomized Controlled Trial
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume78
dc.date.issued2019-01-31
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationBatterham, P. J., Centre for Mental Health Research, ANU College of Medicine Biology & Environment, The Australian National University
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1138713
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1083311
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1122544
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1110371
local.identifier.essn1559-2030
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage107
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage107
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage115
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cct.2019.01.015
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenanceElsevier requires authors posting their accepted manuscript to attach a non-commercial Creative Commons user license (CC-BY-NC-ND). http://www.elsevier.com/about/open-access/lightbox_attach-a-user-license (Publisher journal website 6/2/2019)
dc.rights.licenseCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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