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'Humanitarianized' Development? Anti-trafficking Reconfigured

Molland, Sverre

Description

Over the past three decades humanitarianism has broadened considerably in scope. Humanitarian aid agencies have increasingly moved beyond a traditionally narrow concern with immediate relief aid to engage the wider implications of their work. Humanitarian arguments have also become central to policy legitimation in a range of contexts outside the humanitarian aid sector. By contrast, this article, based on research into anti-trafficking programmes in the Mekong region of Southeast Asia,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMolland, Sverre
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-17T04:52:47Z
dc.date.available2018-12-17T04:52:47Z
dc.identifier.issn0012-155X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/154713
dc.description.abstractOver the past three decades humanitarianism has broadened considerably in scope. Humanitarian aid agencies have increasingly moved beyond a traditionally narrow concern with immediate relief aid to engage the wider implications of their work. Humanitarian arguments have also become central to policy legitimation in a range of contexts outside the humanitarian aid sector. By contrast, this article, based on research into anti-trafficking programmes in the Mekong region of Southeast Asia, considers a case where a particular humanitarian discourse has in fact narrowed. Anti-trafficking, once informed by development discourses of poverty reduction and long-term well-being of populations, has become increasingly shaped by a humanitarian emergency logic of exceptionalism. Long-term development modalities have contracted into a zeal for the immediateness of ‘rescues’ and saving lives. By drawing attention to how development and humanitarian discourses intersect in anti-trafficking interventions, this article explores how such shifts in legitimization and mobilization have taken place, in turn transforming actors and practices. The article will suggest that it is the different temporal registers of the two discourses—development and humanitarianism—that help account for this shift from the former to the latter.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis article has been written under the auspices of two research grants: ‘What is safe about safe migration? Migration management in the Mekong’ (Australian Research Council Project no. S6125093) and ‘Developmentality and the anthropology of partnership’ (Research Council of Norway Project no. 262524).
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rights© 2018 International Institute of Social Studies.
dc.sourceDevelopment and Change
dc.title'Humanitarianized' Development? Anti-trafficking Reconfigured
dc.typeJournal article
dc.date.issued2018
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3102795xPUB1548
local.publisher.urlhttp://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationMolland, S.,
local.identifier.doi10.1111/dech.12459
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0012-155X/..."author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). 2 years embargo" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 26/02/19). This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [Molland, Sverre. "‘Humanitarianized’Development? Anti‐trafficking Reconfigured." Development and Change (2018).], which has been published in final form at https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dech.12459. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
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