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The Failures of Translation across Incommensurable Knowledge Systems: A Case Study of Arabic Grammar Instruction

Uhlmann, A

Description

For nearly four decades, Ian Keen has been an important, challenging, and engaging presence in Australian anthropology. Beginning with his PhD research in the mid-1970s and through to the present, he has been a leading scholar of Yolngu society and culture, and has made lasting contributions to a range of debates. His scholarly productivity, however, has never been limited to the Yolngu, and he has conducted research and published widely on many other facets of Australian Aboriginal society: on...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorUhlmann, A
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-30T01:19:07Z
dc.date.available2018-11-30T01:19:07Z
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-925022629
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/153941
dc.description.abstractFor nearly four decades, Ian Keen has been an important, challenging, and engaging presence in Australian anthropology. Beginning with his PhD research in the mid-1970s and through to the present, he has been a leading scholar of Yolngu society and culture, and has made lasting contributions to a range of debates. His scholarly productivity, however, has never been limited to the Yolngu, and he has conducted research and published widely on many other facets of Australian Aboriginal society: on Aboriginal culture in ‘settled’ Australia; comparative historical work on Aboriginal societies at the threshold of colonisation; a continuing interest in kinship; ongoing writing on language and society; and a set of significant land claims across the continent. In this volume of essays in his honour, a group of Keen’s former students and current colleagues celebrate the diversity of his scholarly interests and his inspiring influence as a mentor and a friend, with contributions ranging across language structure, meaning, and use; the post-colonial engagement of Aboriginal Australians with the ideas and structures of ‘mainstream’ society; ambiguity and indeterminacy in Aboriginal symbolic systems and ritual practices; and many other interconnected themes, each of which represents a string that he has woven into the rich tapestry of his scholarly work.
dc.format.extent17 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherANU Press
dc.relation.ispartofStrings of Connectedness: Essays in Honour of Ian Keen
dc.relation.isversionof1st Edition
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.sourceStrings of Connectedness: Essays in Honour of Ian Keen
dc.source.urihttp://press.anu.edu.au?p=325141
dc.titleThe Failures of Translation across Incommensurable Knowledge Systems: A Case Study of Arabic Grammar Instruction
dc.typeBook chapter
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor160104 - Social and Cultural Anthropology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4070761xPUB165
local.publisher.urlhttp://press.anu.edu.au/
local.type.statusMetadata only
local.contributor.affiliationUhlmann, A, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage143
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage159
local.identifier.absseo970116 - Expanding Knowledge through Studies of Human Society
dc.date.updated2018-11-29T08:18:56Z
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationCanberra, ACT, Australia
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access via publisher website
CollectionsANU Press (1965-Present)

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