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Relative competence of native and exotic fish hosts for two generalist native trematodes

Paterson, Rachel A; Lal, Aparna; Dale, Marcia; Townsend, Colin R; Poulin, Robert; Tompkins, Daniel M

Description

Exotic fish species frequently acquire native parasites despite the absence of closely related native hosts. They thus have the potential to affect native counterparts by altering native host–parasite dynamics. In New Zealand, exotic brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss have acquired two native trematodes (Telogaster opisthorchis and Stegodexamene anguillae) from their native definitive host (the longfin eel Anguilla dieffenbachii). We used a combination of field...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPaterson, Rachel A
dc.contributor.authorLal, Aparna
dc.contributor.authorDale, Marcia
dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Colin R
dc.contributor.authorPoulin, Robert
dc.contributor.authorTompkins, Daniel M
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-29T22:57:20Z
dc.date.available2018-11-29T22:57:20Z
dc.identifier.issn2213-2244
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/153830
dc.description.abstractExotic fish species frequently acquire native parasites despite the absence of closely related native hosts. They thus have the potential to affect native counterparts by altering native host–parasite dynamics. In New Zealand, exotic brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss have acquired two native trematodes (Telogaster opisthorchis and Stegodexamene anguillae) from their native definitive host (the longfin eel Anguilla dieffenbachii). We used a combination of field surveys and experimental infections to determine the relative competence of native and exotic fish hosts for these native parasites. Field observations indicated that the longfin eel was the superior host for both parasites, although differences between native and exotic hosts were less apparent for S. anguillae. Experimental infections indicated that both parasites had poorer establishment and survival in salmonids, although some worms matured and attained similar sizes to those in eels before dying. Overall, the field surveys and experimental infections indicate that these exotic salmonids are poor hosts of both native trematodes and their presence may decrease native parasite flow to native hosts.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd
dc.sourceInternational Journal for Parasitology:Parasites and Wildlife
dc.subjectSalmo trutta, Oncorhynchus mykiss, New Zealand, Parasite, Salmonid, Disease
dc.titleRelative competence of native and exotic fish hosts for two generalist native trematodes
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume2
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor111706 - Epidemiology
local.identifier.absfor111700 - PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5427758xPUB220
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPaterson, Rachel A, University of Otago
local.contributor.affiliationLal, Aparna, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationDale, Marcia, University of Otago
local.contributor.affiliationTownsend, Colin R, University of Otago
local.contributor.affiliationPoulin, Robert, University of Otago
local.contributor.affiliationTompkins, Daniel M, Landcare Research
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage136
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage143
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijppaw.2013.03.004
dc.date.updated2018-11-29T08:17:17Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84888031189
local.identifier.thomsonIDBCI:BCI201600286341
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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