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Ecological correlates to cranial morphology in Leporids (Mammalia, Lagomorpha)

Kraatz, Brian P.; Sherratt, Emma; Bumacod, Nicholas; Wedel, Mathew J.

Description

The mammalian order Lagomorpha has been the subject of many morphometric studies aimed at understanding the relationship between form and function as it relates to locomotion, primarily in postcranial morphology. The leporid cranial skeleton, however, may also reveal information about their ecology, particularly locomotion and vision. Here we investigate the relationship between cranial shape and the degree of facial tilt with locomotion (cursoriality, saltation, and burrowing) within crown...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorKraatz, Brian P.
dc.contributor.authorSherratt, Emma
dc.contributor.authorBumacod, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorWedel, Mathew J.
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-29T22:57:15Z
dc.date.available2018-11-29T22:57:15Z
dc.identifier.issn2167-8359
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/153796
dc.description.abstractThe mammalian order Lagomorpha has been the subject of many morphometric studies aimed at understanding the relationship between form and function as it relates to locomotion, primarily in postcranial morphology. The leporid cranial skeleton, however, may also reveal information about their ecology, particularly locomotion and vision. Here we investigate the relationship between cranial shape and the degree of facial tilt with locomotion (cursoriality, saltation, and burrowing) within crown leporids. Our results suggest that facial tilt is more pronounced in cursors and saltators compared to generalists, and that increasing facial tilt may be driven by a need for expanded visual fields. Our phylogenetically informed analyses indicate that burrowing behavior, facial tilt, and locomotor behavior do not predict cranial shape. However, we find that variables such as bullae size, size of the splenius capitus fossa, and overall rostral dimensions are important components for understanding the cranial variation in leporids.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherPeerJ
dc.sourcePeerJ
dc.subjectKeywords: Article; brain function; Caprolagus hispidus; craniofacial morphology; ecology; lagomorph; locomotion; morphometrics; occipital bone; phylogeny; Pronolagus crassicaudatus; rabbits and hares; skull base; statistical analysis; zoology; Lagomorpha; Leporidae Cranial morphology; Lagomorpha; Leporidae; Locomotion
dc.titleEcological correlates to cranial morphology in Leporids (Mammalia, Lagomorpha)
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume3
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor060309 - Phylogeny and Comparative Analysis
local.identifier.absfor060807 - Animal Structure and Function
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB15773
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationKraatz, Brian P., Western University of Health Sciences
local.contributor.affiliationSherratt, Emma, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBumacod, Nicholas, Western University of Health Sciences
local.contributor.affiliationWedel, Mathew J., Western University of Health Sciences
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage20
local.identifier.doi10.7717/peerj.844
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2018-11-29T08:16:42Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84926513150
local.identifier.thomsonID000351673300006
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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