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Deformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography

Piazolo, Sandra; La Fontaine, Alexandre; Trimby, Patrick; Harley, Simon; Yang, Limei; Armstrong, Richard; Cairney, Julie

Description

Trace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal–plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPiazolo, Sandra
dc.contributor.authorLa Fontaine, Alexandre
dc.contributor.authorTrimby, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorHarley, Simon
dc.contributor.authorYang, Limei
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Richard
dc.contributor.authorCairney, Julie
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-29T22:56:33Z
dc.date.available2018-11-29T22:56:33Z
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/153560
dc.description.abstractTrace elements diffuse negligible distances through the pristine crystal lattice in minerals: this is a fundamental assumption when using them to decipher geological processes. For example, the reliable use of the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4) as a U-Th-Pb geochronometer and trace element monitor requires minimal radiogenic isotope and trace element mobility. Here, using atom probe tomography, we document the effects of crystal–plastic deformation on atomic-scale elemental distributions in zircon revealing sub-micrometre-scale mechanisms of trace element mobility. Dislocations that move through the lattice accumulate U and other trace elements. Pipe diffusion along dislocation arrays connected to a chemical or structural sink results in continuous removal of selected elements (for example, Pb), even after deformation has ceased. However, in disconnected dislocations, trace elements remain locked. Our findings have important implications for the use of zircon as a geochronometer, and highlight the importance of deformation on trace element redistribution in minerals and engineering materials.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherMacmillan Publishers Ltd
dc.sourceNature Communications
dc.titleDeformation-induced trace element redistribution in zircon revealed using atom probe tomography
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume7
dc.date.issued2016
local.identifier.absfor040200 - GEOCHEMISTRY
local.identifier.absfor040300 - GEOLOGY
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB11538
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPiazolo, Sandra, Macquarie University
local.contributor.affiliationLa Fontaine, Alexandre, University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationTrimby, Patrick, University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationHarley, Simon, University of Edinburgh
local.contributor.affiliationYang, Limei, University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationArmstrong, Richard, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCairney, Julie, University of Sydney
local.bibliographicCitation.issue10490
local.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms10490
local.identifier.absseo970104 - Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
dc.date.updated2018-11-29T08:12:59Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84957999156
local.identifier.thomsonID000371012100002
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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