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Methods to determine the lagrangian shear experienced by platelets during thrombus growth

Pinar, I; Arthur, JF; Andrews, Robert; Gardiner, Elizabeth; Ryan, K; Carberry, J

Description

Platelets can become activated in response to changes in flow-induced shear; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not clearly understood. Here we present new techniques for experimentally measuring the flow-induced shear rate experienced by platelets prior to adhering to a thrombus. We examined the dynamics of blood flow around experimentally grown thrombus geometries using a novel combination of experimental (ex vivo) and numerical (in silico) methodologies. Using a microcapillary...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPinar, I
dc.contributor.authorArthur, JF
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Robert
dc.contributor.authorGardiner, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorRyan, K
dc.contributor.authorCarberry, J
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-29T22:56:12Z
dc.date.available2018-11-29T22:56:12Z
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/153437
dc.description.abstractPlatelets can become activated in response to changes in flow-induced shear; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not clearly understood. Here we present new techniques for experimentally measuring the flow-induced shear rate experienced by platelets prior to adhering to a thrombus. We examined the dynamics of blood flow around experimentally grown thrombus geometries using a novel combination of experimental (ex vivo) and numerical (in silico) methodologies. Using a microcapillary system, platelet aggregate formation was analysed at elevated shear rates in the presence of coagulation inhibitors, where thrombus formation is predominantly platelet-dependent. These approaches permit the resolution and quantification of thrombus parameters at the scale of individual platelets (2 μm) in order to quantify real time thrombus development. Using our new techniques we can correlate the shear rate experienced by platelets with the extent of platelet adhesion and aggregation. The techniques presented offer the unique capacity to determine the flow properties for a temporally evolving thrombus field in real time.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.sourcePLOS ONE (Public Library of Science)
dc.titleMethods to determine the lagrangian shear experienced by platelets during thrombus growth
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume10
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor060110 - Receptors and Membrane Biology
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB17139
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPinar, I, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
local.contributor.affiliationArthur, JF, Australian Centre for Blood Diseases, Monash University
local.contributor.affiliationAndrews, Robert, Monash University
local.contributor.affiliationGardiner, Elizabeth, College of Health and Medicine, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRyan, K, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
local.contributor.affiliationCarberry, J, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
local.bibliographicCitation.issue12
local.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0144860
dc.date.updated2018-11-29T08:10:42Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84957108671
local.identifier.thomsonID000366715900122
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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