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Deeply dredged submarine HIMU glasses from the Tuvalu Islands, Polynesia: Implications for volatile budgets of recycled oceanic crust

Jackson, Matthew; Koga, K. T; Price, A; Konter, J. G; Koppers, Anthony A P; Finlayson, V.A.; Konrad, K.; Hauri, E.H.; Kylander-Clark, A.; Kelley, Katherine; Kendrick, Mark

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Ocean island basalts (OIB) with extremely radiogenic Pb-isotopic signatures are melts of a mantle component called HIMU (high µ, high 238U/204Pb). Until now, deeply dredged submarine HIMU glasses have not been available, which has inhibited complete geochemical (in particular, volatile element) characterization of the HIMU mantle. We report major, trace and volatile element abundances in a suite of deeply dredged glasses from the Tuvalu Islands. Three Tuvalu glasses with the most extreme HIMU...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorJackson, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorKoga, K. T
dc.contributor.authorPrice, A
dc.contributor.authorKonter, J. G
dc.contributor.authorKoppers, Anthony A P
dc.contributor.authorFinlayson, V.A.
dc.contributor.authorKonrad, K.
dc.contributor.authorHauri, E.H.
dc.contributor.authorKylander-Clark, A.
dc.contributor.authorKelley, Katherine
dc.contributor.authorKendrick, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-29T22:55:19Z
dc.date.available2018-11-29T22:55:19Z
dc.identifier.issn1525-2027
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/153124
dc.description.abstractOcean island basalts (OIB) with extremely radiogenic Pb-isotopic signatures are melts of a mantle component called HIMU (high µ, high 238U/204Pb). Until now, deeply dredged submarine HIMU glasses have not been available, which has inhibited complete geochemical (in particular, volatile element) characterization of the HIMU mantle. We report major, trace and volatile element abundances in a suite of deeply dredged glasses from the Tuvalu Islands. Three Tuvalu glasses with the most extreme HIMU signatures have F/Nd ratios (35.6 ± 3.6) that are higher than the ratio (∼21) for global OIB and MORB, consistent with elevated F/Nd ratios in end-member HIMU Mangaia melt inclusions. The Tuvalu glasses with the most extreme HIMU composition have Cl/K (0.11–0.12), Br/Cl (0.0024), and I/Cl (5–6 × 10−5) ratios that preclude significant assimilation of seawater-derived Cl. The new HIMU glasses that are least degassed for H2O have low H2O/Ce ratios (75–84), similar to ratios identified in end-member OIB glasses with EM1 and EM2 signatures, but significantly lower than H2O/Ce ratios (119–245) previously measured in melt inclusions from Mangaia. CO2-H2O equilibrium solubility models suggest that these HIMU glasses (recovered in two different dredges at 2500–3600 m water depth) have eruption pressures of 295–400 bars. We argue that degassing is unlikely to significantly reduce the primary melt H2O. Thus, the lower H2O/Ce in the HIMU Tuvalu glasses is a mantle signature. We explore oceanic crust recycling as the origin of the low H2O/Ce (∼50–80) in the EM1, EM2, and HIMU mantle domains.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Union
dc.sourceGeochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems
dc.titleDeeply dredged submarine HIMU glasses from the Tuvalu Islands, Polynesia: Implications for volatile budgets of recycled oceanic crust
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume16
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor040299 - Geochemistry not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.absfor040304 - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology
local.identifier.absfor040305 - Marine Geoscience
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB7662
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationJackson, Matthew, University of California Santa Barbara
local.contributor.affiliationKoga, K.T., Universite Blaise Pascal
local.contributor.affiliationPrice, A., University of California
local.contributor.affiliationKonter, J.G., University of Hawaii
local.contributor.affiliationKoppers, Anthony A P, Oregon State University
local.contributor.affiliationFinlayson, V.A., University of Hawaii
local.contributor.affiliationKonrad, K., Oregon State University
local.contributor.affiliationHauri, E.H., Carnegie Institution of Washingtn
local.contributor.affiliationKylander-Clark, A., University of California
local.contributor.affiliationKelley, Katherine, University of Rhode Island
local.contributor.affiliationKendrick, Mark, College of Science, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue9
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage3210
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage3234
local.identifier.doi10.1002/2015GC005966
local.identifier.absseo970104 - Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
dc.date.updated2018-11-29T08:05:41Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84944441063
local.identifier.thomsonID000365039400028
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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