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Zimbabwe's Emigrants: Growth and Change in Australia

Lucas, David; Edgar, Barbara

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Prior to 2006 the Zimbabwe-born in Australia were largely ignored or subsumed within broader geographical “Africa” categories. However between 2001 and 2006 their numbers almost doubled to become the second most numerous birthplace group from sub-Saharan Africa. This prompted Lucas, Jamali and Edgar (2011) to analyse their basic characteristics, one finding being that they were increasingly of non-European ancestry. This article builds upon this work by analysing 2011 Australian census data...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLucas, David
dc.contributor.authorEdgar, Barbara
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-29T22:55:00Z
dc.date.available2018-11-29T22:55:00Z
dc.identifier.issn1447-8420
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/153004
dc.description.abstractPrior to 2006 the Zimbabwe-born in Australia were largely ignored or subsumed within broader geographical “Africa” categories. However between 2001 and 2006 their numbers almost doubled to become the second most numerous birthplace group from sub-Saharan Africa. This prompted Lucas, Jamali and Edgar (2011) to analyse their basic characteristics, one finding being that they were increasingly of non-European ancestry. This article builds upon this work by analysing 2011 Australian census data with a particular focus on European and African components of the Zimbabwe-born. It examines the age/sex structures, occupations, industries, and Australian citizenship take-up rates of each subgroup, identified by their ancestries and languages. Both components are strongly represented in managerial/professional occupations. Unlike the situation in the United Kingdom, mentioned below, there is no strong evidence of deskilling. Although the ethnic composition has changed, the high socioeconomic status of Zimbabwean immigrants is indicated by the predominance of skilled migrants among settler arrivals since 1991. This is contrasted with immigrants from refugee source countries in Africa, who have often experienced interrupted schooling. Another finding is that the majority of both English speakers and African language speakers have taken up Australian citizenship, suggesting that return migration is unlikely to be significant in the immediate future. The substantial flows from Zimbabwe to Australia since 2000 are shown to reflect government policies and the state of the economy in both countries.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherAfrican Studies Association of Australasia and the Pacific
dc.sourceAustralasian Review of African Studies
dc.titleZimbabwe's Emigrants: Growth and Change in Australia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume37
dc.date.issued2016
local.identifier.absfor160303 - Migration
local.identifier.ariespublicationu5257656xPUB1
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLucas, David, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationEdgar, Barbara, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage33
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage55
local.identifier.doi10.22160/22035184/ARAS-2016-37-2/33-55
local.identifier.absseo940111 - Ethnicity, Multiculturalism and Migrant Development and Welfare
dc.date.updated2018-11-29T08:03:57Z
local.identifier.thomsonID000390875700003
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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