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Profiling the mobile-only population in Australia: insights from the Australian National Health Survey

Baffour-Awuah, Bernard; Haynes, Michele; Dinsdale, Shane; Western, Mark; Pennay, Darren

Description

Background: The Australian population that relies on mobile phones exclusively has increased from 5% in 2005 to 29% in 2014. Failing to include this mobile-only population leads to a potential bias in estimates from landline-based telephone surveys. This paper considers the impacts on selected health prevalence estimates with and without the mobile-only population. Methods: Using data from the Australian Health Survey – which, for the first time, included a question on telephone status – we...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBaffour-Awuah, Bernard
dc.contributor.authorHaynes, Michele
dc.contributor.authorDinsdale, Shane
dc.contributor.authorWestern, Mark
dc.contributor.authorPennay, Darren
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-29T22:54:54Z
dc.date.available2018-11-29T22:54:54Z
dc.identifier.issn1326-0200
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/152965
dc.description.abstractBackground: The Australian population that relies on mobile phones exclusively has increased from 5% in 2005 to 29% in 2014. Failing to include this mobile-only population leads to a potential bias in estimates from landline-based telephone surveys. This paper considers the impacts on selected health prevalence estimates with and without the mobile-only population. Methods: Using data from the Australian Health Survey – which, for the first time, included a question on telephone status – we examined demographic, geographic and health differences between the landline-accessible and mobile-only population. These groups were also compared to the full population, controlling for the sampling design and differential non-response patterns in the observed sample through weighting and benchmarking. Results: The landline-accessible population differs from the mobile-only population for selected health measures resulting in biased prevalence estimates for smoking, alcohol risk and private health insurance coverage in the full population. The differences remain even after adjusting for age and gender. Conclusions: Using landline telephones only for conducting population health surveys will have an impact on prevalence rate estimates of health risk factors due to the differing profiles of the mobile-only population from the landline-accessible population.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherPublic Health Association of Australia
dc.sourceAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
dc.titleProfiling the mobile-only population in Australia: insights from the Australian National Health Survey
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume40
dc.date.issued2016
local.identifier.absfor111104 - Public Nutrition Intervention
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4326120xPUB720
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBaffour-Awuah, Bernard, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHaynes, Michele, University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationDinsdale, Shane, University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationWestern, Mark, University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationPennay, Darren, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage443
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage447
local.identifier.doi10.1111/1753-6405.12549
dc.date.updated2018-11-29T08:03:17Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84989807052
local.identifier.thomsonID000385669900008
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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