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Western diet is associated with a smaller hippocampus: a longitudinal investigation

Jacka, Felice N; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Sachdev, Perminder; Butterworth, Peter; Anstey, Kaarin

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BACKGROUND Recent meta-analyses confirm a relationship between diet quality and both depression and cognitive health in adults. While the biological pathways that underpin these relationships are likely multitudinous, extensive evidence from animal studies points to the involvement of the hippocampus. The aim of this study was to examine the association between dietary patterns and hippocampal volume in humans, and to assess whether diet was associated with differential rates of hippocampal...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorJacka, Felice N
dc.contributor.authorCherbuin, Nicolas
dc.contributor.authorSachdev, Perminder
dc.contributor.authorButterworth, Peter
dc.contributor.authorAnstey, Kaarin
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-09T00:06:16Z
dc.date.available2015-09-09T00:06:16Z
dc.identifier.issn1741-7015
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12916-015-0461-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/15259
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND Recent meta-analyses confirm a relationship between diet quality and both depression and cognitive health in adults. While the biological pathways that underpin these relationships are likely multitudinous, extensive evidence from animal studies points to the involvement of the hippocampus. The aim of this study was to examine the association between dietary patterns and hippocampal volume in humans, and to assess whether diet was associated with differential rates of hippocampal atrophy over time. METHODS Data were drawn from the Personality and Total Health Through Life Study and focused on a subsample of the cohort (n = 255) who were aged 60–64 years at baseline in 2001, completed a food frequency questionnaire, and underwent two magnetic resonance imaging scans approximately 4 years apart. Longitudinal generalized estimating equation linear regression models were used to assess the association between dietary factors and left and right hippocampal volumes over time. RESULTS Every one standard deviation increase in healthy “prudent” dietary pattern was associated with a 45.7 mm3 (standard error 22.9 mm3) larger left hippocampal volume, while higher consumption of an unhealthy “Western” dietary pattern was (independently) associated with a 52.6 mm3 (SE 26.6 mm3) smaller left hippocampal volume. These relationships were independent of covariates including age, gender, education, labour-force status, depressive symptoms and medication, physical activity, smoking, hypertension and diabetes. While hippocampal volume declined over time, there was no evidence that dietary patterns influenced this decline. No relationships were observed between dietary patterns and right hippocampal volume. CONCLUSIONS Lower intakes of nutrient-dense foods and higher intakes of unhealthy foods are each independently associated with smaller left hippocampal volume. To our knowledge, this is the first human study to demonstrate associations between diet and hippocampal volume concordant with data previously observed in animal models.
dc.description.sponsorshipFNJ is funded by Deakin University and has received Grant/Research support from the Brain and Behaviour Research Institute, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), Australian Rotary Health, the Geelong Medical Research Foundation, the Ian Potter Foundation, Eli Lilly, the Meat and Livestock Board and The University of Melbourne and has received speakers’ honoraria from Sanofi-Synthelabo, Janssen Cilag, Servier, Pfizer, Health Ed, Network Nutrition, Angelini Farmaceutica, and Eli Lilly. KJA is funded by NHMRC Research Fellowship No. 1002560. NC is funded by an ARC Future Fellowship No. 120100227. PB is funded by an ARC Future Fellowship # FT130101444. The PATH study was supported by NHMRC Grants No. 973302, Program Grants No. 179805 and 350833, and NHMRC project grant No. 157125 and 1063907.
dc.format8 pages
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.rights© 2015 Jacka et al. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.sourceBMC Medicine
dc.subjectBrain derived neurotrophic factor
dc.subjectHippocampus
dc.subjectDiet
dc.subjectMagnetic resonance imaging
dc.subjectNeurogenesis
dc.subjectNutrition
dc.titleWestern diet is associated with a smaller hippocampus: a longitudinal investigation
dc.typeJournal article
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderJacka et al.
local.identifier.citationvolume13
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-08-25
dc.date.issued2015-09-08
local.identifier.absfor110300 - CLINICAL SCIENCES
local.identifier.absfor111700 - PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES
local.identifier.absfor170100 - PSYCHOLOGY
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB3316
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCherbuin, Nicolas, Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, CMBE Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationAnstey, Kaarin J., Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, CMBE Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationButterworth, Peter, Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, CMBE Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1002560
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/120100227
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT130101444
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/973302
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/179805
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/350833
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/157125
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1063907
local.identifier.essn1741-7015
local.bibliographicCitation.issue215
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage8
local.identifier.doidoi:10.1186/s12916-015-0461-x
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:07:38Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84941218822
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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