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Evaluating the roles of directed breeding and gene flow in animal domestication

Marshall, Fiona B.; Dobney, Keith; Denham, Timothy; Capriles, Jose M

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For the last 150 y scholars have focused upon the roles of intentional breeding and genetic isolation as fundamental to understanding the process of animal domestication. This analysis of ethnoarchaeological, archaeological, and genetic data suggests that long-term gene flow between wild and domestic stocks was much more common than previously assumed, and that selective breeding of females was largely absent during the early phases of animal domestication. These findings challenge assumptions...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Fiona B.
dc.contributor.authorDobney, Keith
dc.contributor.authorDenham, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorCapriles, Jose M
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-29T22:53:06Z
dc.date.available2018-11-29T22:53:06Z
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/152375
dc.description.abstractFor the last 150 y scholars have focused upon the roles of intentional breeding and genetic isolation as fundamental to understanding the process of animal domestication. This analysis of ethnoarchaeological, archaeological, and genetic data suggests that long-term gene flow between wild and domestic stocks was much more common than previously assumed, and that selective breeding of females was largely absent during the early phases of animal domestication. These findings challenge assumptions about severe genetic bottlenecks during domestication, expectations regarding monophyletic origins, and interpretations of multiple domestications. The findings also raise new questions regarding ways in which behavioral and phenotypic domestication traits were developed and maintained.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences (USA)
dc.sourcePNAS - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
dc.subjectKeywords: Artiodactyla; breeding; cattle; directional selection; DNA methylation; domestic animal; domestication; environment; gene flow; goat; historical period; horse; human; human relation; migration; nonhuman; priority journal; review; sheep; social environment Donkey; Pig; Reproductive isolation; Selected breeding; Zooarchaeology
dc.titleEvaluating the roles of directed breeding and gene flow in animal domestication
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume111
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor210100 - ARCHAEOLOGY
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4070761xPUB77
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMarshall, Fiona B. , Department of Anthropology, Washington University in St Louis,
local.contributor.affiliationDobney, Keith, University of Aberdeen
local.contributor.affiliationDenham, Timothy, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCapriles, Jose M , Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 6-D, Arica, Chile;
local.bibliographicCitation.issue17
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage6153
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage6158
local.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1312984110
local.identifier.absseo970121 - Expanding Knowledge in History and Archaeology
dc.date.updated2018-11-29T07:50:53Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84899656234
local.identifier.thomsonID000335199000028
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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