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A framework for incorporating evolutionary genomics into biodiversity conservation and management

Hoffmann, Ary; Griffin, Philippa; Dillon, Shannon; Catullo, Renee; Rane, Rahul; Byrne, Margaret; Jordan, Rebecca; Oakeshott, John Graham; Weeks, Andrew; Joseph, Leo; Lockhart, Peter; Borevitz, Justin; Sgrò, Carla

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Evolutionary adaptation drives biodiversity. So far, however, evolutionary thinking has had limited impact on plans to counter the effects of climate change on biodiversity and associated ecosystem services. This is despite habitat fragmentation diminishing the ability of populations to mount evolutionary responses, via reductions in population size, reductions in gene flow and reductions in the heterogeneity of environments that populations occupy. Research on evolutionary adaptation to other...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHoffmann, Ary
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, Philippa
dc.contributor.authorDillon, Shannon
dc.contributor.authorCatullo, Renee
dc.contributor.authorRane, Rahul
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Margaret
dc.contributor.authorJordan, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorOakeshott, John Graham
dc.contributor.authorWeeks, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorJoseph, Leo
dc.contributor.authorLockhart, Peter
dc.contributor.authorBorevitz, Justin
dc.contributor.authorSgrò, Carla
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-06T23:59:07Z
dc.date.available2015-09-06T23:59:07Z
dc.identifier.issn2053-7565
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40665-014-0009-x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/15222
dc.description.abstractEvolutionary adaptation drives biodiversity. So far, however, evolutionary thinking has had limited impact on plans to counter the effects of climate change on biodiversity and associated ecosystem services. This is despite habitat fragmentation diminishing the ability of populations to mount evolutionary responses, via reductions in population size, reductions in gene flow and reductions in the heterogeneity of environments that populations occupy. Research on evolutionary adaptation to other challenges has benefitted enormously in recent years from genomic tools, but these have so far only been applied to the climate change issue in a piecemeal manner. Here, we explore how new genomic knowledge might be combined with evolutionary thinking in a decision framework aimed at reducing the long-term impacts of climate change on biodiversity and ecosystem services. This framework highlights the need to rethink local conservation and management efforts in biodiversity conservation. We take a dynamic view of biodiversity based on the recognition of continuously evolving lineages, and we highlight when and where new genomic approaches are justified. In general, and despite challenges in developing genomic tools for non-model organisms, genomics can help management decide when resources should be redirected to increasing gene flow and hybridisation across climate zones and facilitating in situ evolutionary change in large heterogeneous areas. It can also help inform when conservation priorities need to shift from maintaining genetically distinct populations and species to supporting processes of evolutionary change. We illustrate our argument with particular reference to Australia’s biodiversity.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis paper arose out of a workshop funded through the Office of the Chief Executive Science Team at CSIRO and the Science Industry Endowment Fund.
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.rights© 2015 Hoffmann et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.sourceClimate Change Responses
dc.titleA framework for incorporating evolutionary genomics into biodiversity conservation and management
dc.typeJournal article
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.rights.holderHoffmann et al.; licensee BioMed Central.
local.identifier.citationvolume2
dc.date.issued2015-01-28
local.identifier.absfor060399 - Evolutionary Biology not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3700390xPUB195
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCatullo, R., Research School of Biology, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn2053-7565
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage23
local.identifier.doi10.1186/s40665-014-0009-x
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2018-11-29T08:15:35Z
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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