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Comparing regime continuity and change: Indonesia, Thailand and Malaysia

Case, William

Description

A vast literature has accumulated about democratic preconditions, transition, and consolidation in developing countries, highlighting the centrality of these themes in comparative politics today. Further, much of this discussion has been collated among the geographic areas through which democracy's 'third wave' (Huntington 1990) has recently passed, enabling specialists to control for important contextual variables. In explaining regime openings in the relatively uniform settings of South...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCase, William
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-04T05:07:07Z
dc.date.available2015-09-04T05:07:07Z
dc.date.created1995
dc.identifier.isbn0731521544
dc.identifier.issn1037-1036
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/15208
dc.description.abstractA vast literature has accumulated about democratic preconditions, transition, and consolidation in developing countries, highlighting the centrality of these themes in comparative politics today. Further, much of this discussion has been collated among the geographic areas through which democracy's 'third wave' (Huntington 1990) has recently passed, enabling specialists to control for important contextual variables. In explaining regime openings in the relatively uniform settings of South America, southern Europe, eastern Europe, and East Asia, for example, area specialists have been able to analytically set aside such disparate, though significant, features and legacies as bureaucratic authoritarianism, latifundist agriculture, Soviet antecedents, new NIC statuses, Catholicism, Confucianism, and varying degrees of ethnic or cultural complexity. This has permitted, in short, much comparative work, the testing of relatively uncluttered causal statements across a number of cases. Then, after sketching out bold regional generalizations, specialists have been able to factor in fine country uniqueness's, specifying with even greater exactness the relationships between democratic pressures and outcomes. (First paragraph.)
dc.format.extent1 vol.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherDept. of Political and Social Change, Research School of Pacific Studies, The Australian National University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesRegime change and regime maintenance in Asia and the Pacific. Discussion Paper No.15
dc.rights© Department of Political and Social Change, Research School of Pacific Studies, The Australian National University, 1995. Apart from any fair dealings for the purpose of study, criticism or review, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission. Enquiries may be made to the publisher.
dc.subjectIndonesia
dc.subjectThailand
dc.subjectMalaysia
dc.subjectpolitics
dc.subjectgovernment
dc.titleComparing regime continuity and change: Indonesia, Thailand and Malaysia
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
local.type.statusPublished version
local.contributor.affiliationCase, William, Department of Political and Social Change, Research School of Pacific Studies, The Australian National University
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage40
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU College of Asia & the Pacific

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