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Increased simulated risk of the hot Australian summer of 2012/13 due to anthropogenic activity as measured by heat wave frequency and intensity

Perkins, Sarah E.; Lewis (previously Bretherton), Sophie; King, Andrew D.; Alexander, Lisa

Description

The Australian summer of 2012/13 was the warmest since records began in 1910 (Bureau of Meteorology 2013a). The season was characterized by the hottest month on record (January), where the continental mean temperature reached 36.9°C. Averaged nationally, the last four months of 2012 were 1.61°C higher than the long-term mean. Rainfall was below average for much of the country since July 2012. Along with the late onset of the Australian monsoon, such conditions primed the continent for...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPerkins, Sarah E.
dc.contributor.authorLewis (previously Bretherton), Sophie
dc.contributor.authorKing, Andrew D.
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Lisa
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-29T22:51:47Z
dc.date.available2018-11-29T22:51:47Z
dc.identifier.issn0003-0007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/151982
dc.description.abstractThe Australian summer of 2012/13 was the warmest since records began in 1910 (Bureau of Meteorology 2013a). The season was characterized by the hottest month on record (January), where the continental mean temperature reached 36.9°C. Averaged nationally, the last four months of 2012 were 1.61°C higher than the long-term mean. Rainfall was below average for much of the country since July 2012. Along with the late onset of the Australian monsoon, such conditions primed the continent for extremely hot summer weather, including heat waves. Heat waves require detailed focus due to their large impacts (Karoly 2009; Coumou and Rahmstorf 2012), particularly on human health and morbidity (Nitschke et al. 2007). Much of inland Australia experienced extreme temperatures for over three consecutive weeks (Bureau of Meteorology 2013a).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Society
dc.sourceAmerican Meteorological Society, Bulletin
dc.titleIncreased simulated risk of the hot Australian summer of 2012/13 due to anthropogenic activity as measured by heat wave frequency and intensity
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume95
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor040105 - Climatology (excl. Climate Change Processes)
local.identifier.absfor040104 - Climate Change Processes
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4279067xPUB1553
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPerkins, Sarah E., University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationLewis (previously Bretherton), Sophie, College of Science, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKing, Andrew D., University of New South Wales
local.contributor.affiliationAlexander, Lisa, University of New South Wales
local.bibliographicCitation.issue9
local.bibliographicCitation.startpageS34
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpageS37
local.identifier.absseo960304 - Climate Variability (excl. Social Impacts)
local.identifier.absseo960307 - Effects of Climate Change and Variability on Australia (excl. Social Impacts)
dc.date.updated2018-11-29T07:40:43Z
local.identifier.thomsonID000344820500010
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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