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Mountains, rivers, billabongs : ethnogeographical categorization in cross-linguistic perspective

Bromhead, Helen

Description

This thesis examines the topic of ethnogeographical categorization by way of looking at the contrastive lexical semantics of a selection of landscape terms in a number of languages. The main languages in focus are English, including the Australian variety of English, French, Spanish, and the Australian Aboriginal language, Pitjantjatjara/Yankunytjatjara. The thesis argues that languages and cultures categorize the geographical environment in diverse ways. Common elements of classification are...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBromhead, Helen
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-22T00:07:05Z
dc.date.available2018-11-22T00:07:05Z
dc.date.copyright2014
dc.identifier.otherb3568423
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/151002
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the topic of ethnogeographical categorization by way of looking at the contrastive lexical semantics of a selection of landscape terms in a number of languages. The main languages in focus are English, including the Australian variety of English, French, Spanish, and the Australian Aboriginal language, Pitjantjatjara/Yankunytjatjara. The thesis argues that languages and cultures categorize the geographical environment in diverse ways. Common elements of classification are found across the selected languages, but it is argued that different priorities are given to these factors. Moreover, the thesis finds that there are language-specific aspects of the landscape terms, often motivated by culture and land use. Notably, this thesis presents ethnogeographical concepts as being anchored in an anthropocentric perspective, based on human vision and experience in space. The Natural Semantic Metalanguage (NSM) technique of semantic analysis is used throughout. The use of the universal concepts and language of NSM allows me to clearly state the cross-cultural and cross-linguistic similarities and differences in the semantics of the landscape terms examined. It is argued that this methodology provides an effective tool in the exploration of ethnogeographical categories. Areas of landscape vocabulary covered in this thesis include words for 'long flowing-water places', such as river, in chapter 3; words for 'standing-water places', such as lake, in chapter 4; words for 'elevated places', such as mountain, in chapter 5; seascape terms, such as coast, in chapter 6; and words for larger areas of the land, such as desert and the bush, in chapters 7 and 8. The thesis also offers suggestions new directions for research.
dc.format.extentix, 303 leaves.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.rightsAuthor retains copyright
dc.subject.lcshComparative linguistics
dc.subject.lcshLanguage and languages Variation
dc.subject.lcshGeographical perception
dc.subject.lcshSemantics, Comparative
dc.titleMountains, rivers, billabongs : ethnogeographical categorization in cross-linguistic perspective
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorWierzbicka, Anna
local.description.notesThesis (Ph.D.)--Australian National University
dc.date.issued2014
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationAustralian National University. School of Language Studies
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d5e74d7aa280
dc.date.updated2018-11-21T05:15:56Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
local.mintdoimint
CollectionsOpen Access Theses

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