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The role of potters at neolithic An S{u1ECF}n, southern Vietnam

Sarjeant, Carmen Kay

Description

This thesis explores the ceramic assemblage from the mound site of An S{u1ECF}n, Long An Province, southern Vietnam. Excavated in 2009, the site has been dated to the second millennium BC, with evidence for neolithic occupation and burials. Very little is known about the neolithic period in southern Vietnam, and the routes and chronology for the appearance of cultivation, domestic animals, and ceramic and lithic technologies associated with sedentary settlements in mainland Southeast Asia are...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSarjeant, Carmen Kay
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-22T00:06:56Z
dc.date.available2018-11-22T00:06:56Z
dc.date.copyright2012
dc.date.created2012
dc.identifier.otherb3087058
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/150931
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the ceramic assemblage from the mound site of An S{u1ECF}n, Long An Province, southern Vietnam. Excavated in 2009, the site has been dated to the second millennium BC, with evidence for neolithic occupation and burials. Very little is known about the neolithic period in southern Vietnam, and the routes and chronology for the appearance of cultivation, domestic animals, and ceramic and lithic technologies associated with sedentary settlements in mainland Southeast Asia are still debated. The ways in which the ceramic material culture at An S{u1ECF}n conforms to the wider neolithic expression observed in Southeast Asia were investigated, and local and regional innovations were identified in this research. The An S{u1ECF}n ceramic assemblage was characterised according to form, decoration and fabric in order to establish a sequence of ceramic forms and decoration, and to interpret the functions of the forms in ritualistic and domestic settings. The fabrics were analysed with scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDX). This was followed by a study of the degree of standardisation of specific forms in order to identify the mental templates for their manufacture. Contextualising the neolithic in southern Vietnam was conducted through a comparative study of material culture between An S{u1ECF}n and the sites of B{u00EA}n {u0110}{u00F2}, B{u00EC}nh {u0110}a, C{u00F9} Lao R{u00F9}a, C{u00E1}i V{u1EA1}n, C{u0203}u S{u1EAF}t, {u0110}a Kai, {u0110}{u00EC}nh {u020E}ng, L{u1ED9}c Giang, R{u1EA1}ch L{u00E1}, R{u1EA1}ch N{u00FA}i and Su{u00F4}i Linh, all in southern Vietnam. The results indicated there were two main groups of sites, one along the V{u00E0}m C{u00F2} {u00D0}{u00F4}ng River, including An S{u1ECF}n, and another along the {u00D0}{u00F4}ng Nai River. Another analysis was carried out to contextualise An S{u1ECF}n in the wider neolithic landscape of mainland Southeast Asia, between An S{u1ECF}n and Ban Non Wat, early Ban Lum Khao, early Ban Chiang, early Non Nok Tha, Khok Charoen, Tha Kae, Khok Phanom Di, Nong Nor (phase 1), Samrong Sen, Laang Spean, Krek, B{u00E0}u Tr{u00F3}, M{u00E1}n B{u1EA1}c and X{u00F3}m Ren. Aspects of material culture at An S{u1ECF}n appear to have ancestral links to distant localities in northeast and central Thailand. There were specific parallels between Nong Nor (phase 1), Krek and An S{u1ECF}n, however the analysis indicated there was ongoing interaction between southern Vietnam and southeastern Cambodia. The initial occupation of An S{u1ECF}n incorporated a small variety of ceramic vessel forms, and there was a rapid introduction of fibre tempering and new forms to the repertoire soon after settlement. The use of fibre temper appeared simultaneously with evidence for domestic animals and the appearance of local ceramic forms, including distinctive wavy rimmed bowls. The assemblage expanded quickly and a community of potters established mental templates for specific forms in terms of morphological, decorative and fabric choices, indicating a long-lasting An S{u1ECF}n ceramic tradition. The potters both recalled the past through continuing adherence to widespread neolithic ceramic traditions, and at the same time invested in new traditions that reaffirmed local identity.
dc.format.extentxxii, 490 leaves
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.rightsAuthor retains copyright
dc.subject.lccGN836.V6 S37 2012
dc.subject.lcshPottery, Prehistoric Vietnam Long An (Province)
dc.subject.lcshPrehistoric peoples Vietnam Long An (Province)
dc.subject.lcshExcavations Vietnam Long An (Province)
dc.subject.lcshEthnoarchaeology Vietnam Long An (Province)
dc.subject.lcshLong An (Vietnam : Province) Antiquities
dc.titleThe role of potters at neolithic An S{u1ECF}n, southern Vietnam
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.description.notesThesis (Ph.D.)--Australian National University
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d5e775ed3b6d
dc.date.updated2018-11-21T04:22:57Z
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
local.mintdoimint
CollectionsOpen Access Theses

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