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Screening for psychological distress in newly diagnosed cancer patients

Blandford, Karen Gwendolene

Description

The present research explored screening for psychosocial distress in newly diagnosed cancer patients. In particular this research examined the use of the Distress Thermometer, the SPHERE-SF12, the DASS-42, and the SCNS in screening for psychosocial distress in this population. The utility of the Distress Thermometer was compared against the SPHERE-SF12, in terms of both instruments ability to detect psychological distress 'caseness'. The utility of the SPHERE-SF12 was also explored in terms of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBlandford, Karen Gwendolene
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-22T00:05:48Z
dc.date.available2018-11-22T00:05:48Z
dc.date.copyright2014
dc.date.created2014
dc.identifier.otherb3578993
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/150478
dc.description.abstractThe present research explored screening for psychosocial distress in newly diagnosed cancer patients. In particular this research examined the use of the Distress Thermometer, the SPHERE-SF12, the DASS-42, and the SCNS in screening for psychosocial distress in this population. The utility of the Distress Thermometer was compared against the SPHERE-SF12, in terms of both instruments ability to detect psychological distress 'caseness'. The utility of the SPHERE-SF12 was also explored in terms of its ability to measure psychological morbidity in relation to participant scores for depression, anxiety, and stress on the DASS-42. Also examined was the acceptability of psychosocial screening to newly diagnosed cancer patients. Two studies were conducted as part of this research. Study 1 included 163 newly diagnosed cancer patients and sought to investigate the utility and feasibility of the introduction of a routine standardised psychosocial screening program for all newly diagnosed patients at participating oncology clinics within the ACT. The introduction of a psychological screening program explored rates of referral to psychosocial services, both prior to and following introduction of a screening program, as well as patient (participant) attitudes towards screening and acceptability of psychosocial screening by participants. The effectiveness of the Distress Thermometer, the DASS-42, and the SPHERE-SF12 as a screening tool for psychological distress was demonstrated. The use of the Distress Thermometer as a mechanism of referral to psychosocial services was demonstrated, with an increase in direct referrals to psychosocial services following its introduction. Participant responses indicated that psychosocial screening was acceptable, with participants reporting a positive attitude towards psychosocial screening. Study 2 included 118 participants from Study 1, and sought to investigate the level of unmet supportive care needs in newly diagnosed cancer patients, at six months following their initial visit to the oncology clinic, using the Supportive Care Needs Survey Short Form 34 (SCNS-SF34). Participant scores on the SCNS-SF34 revealed the highest areas of unmet were in the psychological and health system and information domains. These results are in line with other research into supportive care needs, which have also reported levels of unmet need in these areas. Statistical analysis also revealed significant correlations on all of the domains in the SCNS-SF34.
dc.format.extentxii, 257 leaves.
dc.subject.lcshCancer Diagnosis
dc.subject.lcshCancer Diagnosis Psychological aspects
dc.subject.lcshDistress (Psychology)
dc.subject.lcshPsychological tests
dc.titleScreening for psychological distress in newly diagnosed cancer patients
dc.typeThesis (DPsych(Clinical))
local.description.notesThesis (D.Psych.)--Australian National University, 2014.
local.contributor.affiliationAustralian National University. Research School of Psychology
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d5fcb1c90a39
dc.date.updated2018-11-21T00:29:37Z
local.mintdoimint
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