Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Defining the Indefinable: Descriptors of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Cultures and their Links to Health and Wellbeing

Salmon, Minette; Doery, Kate; Dance, Phyll; Chapman, Jan; Gilbert, Ruth; Williams, Rob; Lovett, Raymond

Description

This report was funded by the Lowitja Institute and is part of the development of Mayi Kuwayu: The National Study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing; a national longitudinal study exploring the relationship between Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander wellbeing and culture. This review was conducted to explore what cultural factors are important to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and gain an understanding of how these factors relate to health and wellbeing. We examined...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSalmon, Minette
dc.contributor.authorDoery, Kate
dc.contributor.authorDance, Phyll
dc.contributor.authorChapman, Jan
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, Ruth
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Rob
dc.contributor.authorLovett, Raymond
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-16T01:12:19Z
dc.date.available2018-10-16T01:12:19Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/148406
dc.description.abstractThis report was funded by the Lowitja Institute and is part of the development of Mayi Kuwayu: The National Study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing; a national longitudinal study exploring the relationship between Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander wellbeing and culture. This review was conducted to explore what cultural factors are important to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and gain an understanding of how these factors relate to health and wellbeing. We examined the Australian literature as well as publications from countries that have experienced similar colonisation events; primarily Aotearoa (New Zealand), Canada and the United States. Our main findings from this synthesis determined six main domains used to describe culture for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. These domains were: Connection to Country; Cultural Beliefs and Knowledge; Language; Family, Kinship and Community; Expression and Cultural Continuity; and Self-determination and Leadership.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Lowitja Institute Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Cooperative Research Centre funded this review under project 16-SDH-05-03.
dc.format.extent86 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherNational Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health (NCEPH), Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesMayi Kuwayu: The National Study of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Wellbeing
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.subjectAboriginal
dc.subjectTorres Strait Islander
dc.subjectculture
dc.subjectcultural determinants
dc.subjecthealth
dc.subjectwellbeing
dc.titleDefining the Indefinable: Descriptors of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ Cultures and their Links to Health and Wellbeing
dc.typeReport (Research)
dcterms.dateAccepted2018-10-12
dc.date.issued2018
local.publisher.urlhttp://nceph.anu.edu.au
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationRaymond Lovett, National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health Research School of Population Health
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5bdbcdf5c89a7
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health (NCEPH)

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
Defining the Indefinable_Final.pdf1.48 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  23 August 2018/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator