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The New Pacific Review = La Nouvelle Revue du Pacifique : Vol. 1, No. 1 : Pacific Identities : Noumea Symposium Proceedings 15-16 July 1999.

Noumea Symposium (1999 : The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT)

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Why a 'New Pacific Review'? And first of all why the Pacific? The answer is obvious. Since the beginning of the 16th century this vast region, thickly sprinkled with multitudes of islands, large and small, even tiny, has been traversed in every direction, and gradually discovered by voyagers, researchers, adventurers or artists fascinated by the diversity and the complexity of the societies which they were discovering,. Their appraisals oscillated between two extremes, idealizations of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorNoumea Symposium (1999 : The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT)
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-18T01:40:46Z
dc.date.available2015-08-18T01:40:46Z
dc.identifier.issn1445-4947
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/14749
dc.description.abstractWhy a 'New Pacific Review'? And first of all why the Pacific? The answer is obvious. Since the beginning of the 16th century this vast region, thickly sprinkled with multitudes of islands, large and small, even tiny, has been traversed in every direction, and gradually discovered by voyagers, researchers, adventurers or artists fascinated by the diversity and the complexity of the societies which they were discovering,. Their appraisals oscillated between two extremes, idealizations of imaginary paradises or horrified condemnations of barbaric customs which situated these societies at the very beginnings of humanity. And most of these appraisals ended with pessimistic forecasts. Beneath the impact of western civilisation, by the power of its might, the superiority of this wealth and its forms of social organisation, these societies seemed destined to disappear, either physically or culturally, or even both simultaneously. in fact, at the dawn of the 3rd millennium it is noteworthy that this disaster has not happened., this does not mean that Oceanic societies have not been profoundly affected, that the West has not directly interfered in them, right to their very core, in order to bring them into subjection and transform them. But theses societies have not remained passive during this process. Being accustomed to exchange, to mobility, to the borrowing of material goods, rituals and values for centuries they have invented new ways of existing; they have survived. (First paragraph of prologue).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCanberra, ACT : Pandanus Books
dc.publisherCanberra, ACT : Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, The Australian National University.
dc.relation.ispartofPacific Institute Digitisation Project
dc.rightsCopyright The Australian National University
dc.subjectNoumea
dc.subjectpacific
dc.titleThe New Pacific Review = La Nouvelle Revue du Pacifique : Vol. 1, No. 1 : Pacific Identities : Noumea Symposium Proceedings 15-16 July 1999.
dc.typeJournal issue
local.identifier.citationvolume1
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage438
CollectionsThe New Pacific Review = La Nouvelle Revue du Pacifique
ANU Research Publications

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