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Psychological Distress following Injury in a Large Cohort of Thai Adults

Tran, Thanh Tam; Adams-Bedford, Joel; Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Seubsman, Sam-Ang; Sleigh, Adrian

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INTRODUCTION Injury and psychological distress are public health priorities because of their high occurrence in the population. This study examines the longitudinal effects of injury characteristics on psychological distress. METHODS Study participants were enrolled distance learning Thai adults (N = 42,785 at 2013 follow-up) residing nationwide. We analysed 2009 and 2013 data. Injury questions included injury prevalence, causes and levels of severity. Distress was measured using the standard...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorTran, Thanh Tam
dc.contributor.authorAdams-Bedford, Joel
dc.contributor.authorYiengprugsawan, Vasoontara
dc.contributor.authorSeubsman, Sam-Ang
dc.contributor.authorSleigh, Adrian
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-15T00:41:35Z
dc.date.available2018-08-15T00:41:35Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/146397
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION Injury and psychological distress are public health priorities because of their high occurrence in the population. This study examines the longitudinal effects of injury characteristics on psychological distress. METHODS Study participants were enrolled distance learning Thai adults (N = 42,785 at 2013 follow-up) residing nationwide. We analysed 2009 and 2013 data. Injury questions included injury prevalence, causes and levels of severity. Distress was measured using the standard Kessler-6. To assess the risk for post-injury distress, we used multinomial logistic regression investigating psychological distress in 2013 as an outcome including injury categories in both 2009 and 2013 as predictors, adjusted for sociodemographic factors. RESULTS Overall injury was predictive of psychological distress. Both types of injury (traffic and non- traffic) associated with increasing psychological distress. Those that had experienced both types of injuries in the previous year had higher odds of developing psychological distress compared to those who experienced just one type. In 2013, adjusted psychological distress odds ratios were 1.46 [95% Confidence Interval 1.14-1.87] for traffic injury only; 1.26 [1.13-1.40] for non-traffic injury only; and 2.71 [2.19-3.35] for both traffic and non-traffic injuries. Increasing frequency of injury and increasing injury severity were also linked to elevated psychological distress among our Thai cohort members. CONCLUSIONS Our results revealed a significantly high risk of psychological distress following injury. With increasing occurrence of injury, especially traffic injuries in low and middle income countries such as Thailand, future policies should not only focus on physical care but also address psychological distress as an important consequence of injury.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by the International Collaborative Research Grants Scheme with joint grants from the Wellcome Trust UK (GR071587MA) and the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (268055), and as a global health grant from the National Health and Medical Research Council (585426).
dc.format13 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science
dc.rights© 2016 Tran et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
dc.sourcePloS one
dc.subjectaccidents, traffic
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectcohort studies
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthealth priorities
dc.subjecthumans
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmiddle aged
dc.subjectstress, psychological
dc.subjectThailand
dc.subjectwounds and injuries
dc.titlePsychological Distress following Injury in a Large Cohort of Thai Adults
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume11
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-10-01
dc.date.issued2016-10-24
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB4551
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.plos.org/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationTran, Thanh Tam, Department of Global Health and National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Research School of Population Health, ANU College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationAdams-Bedford, Joel, The Australian National University Medical School, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationSleigh, Adrian, Department of Global Health and National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Research School of Population Health, ANU College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, The Australian National University
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/268055
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/585426
local.identifier.essn1932-6203
local.bibliographicCitation.issue10
local.bibliographicCitation.startpagee0164767
local.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0164767
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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