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Indigenous labour force status to the year 2000: Estimated impacts of recent Budget cuts

Hunter, Boyd; Taylor, John

Description

The simulated estimates of Indigenous labour force status used in this paper are based on the Australian Bureau of Statistics projections of Indigenous population to the year 2000 and several reasonable assumptions about the growth in demand for Indigenous labour. The reliance of Indigenous workforce on the continued growth of the Community Development Employment Projects scheme is highlighted by the likely falls in the employment/population ratio and the large increases in unemployment that...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHunter, Boyd
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, John
dc.contributor.otherAustralian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research
dc.coverage.spatialAustralia
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-26T01:56:04Z
dc.date.available2018-07-26T01:56:04Z
dc.date.created1996
dc.identifier.issn1036 1774
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/145549
dc.description.abstractThe simulated estimates of Indigenous labour force status used in this paper are based on the Australian Bureau of Statistics projections of Indigenous population to the year 2000 and several reasonable assumptions about the growth in demand for Indigenous labour. The reliance of Indigenous workforce on the continued growth of the Community Development Employment Projects scheme is highlighted by the likely falls in the employment/population ratio and the large increases in unemployment that will result from any budget-induced curtailment of the scheme's growth. The key dynamic of these simulations is the rapidly growing working-age population. The other prominent factor underlying the results is the ongoing disadvantage of the Indigenous labour force including: poor educational attainment, high arrest rates, low life expectancy and locational disadvantage. One of the major challenges for policy makers within the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission and other government portfolios will be to quickly find alternatives and more permanent means of creating opportunities for new entrants to the Indigenous workforce.
dc.format.extent23 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCanberra, ACT : Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR), The Australian National University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion Paper (Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR), The Australian National University); No. 119/1996
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.titleIndigenous labour force status to the year 2000: Estimated impacts of recent Budget cuts
dc.typeWorking/Technical Paper
local.identifier.absfor169902 - Studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Society
local.type.statusPublished Version
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancePermission to deposit in Open Research received from CAEPR (ERMS2230079)
CollectionsANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR)

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