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Land Rights at Risk? Evaluations of the Reeves Report

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Building on Land Rights for the Next Generation: Report of the Review of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 was completed in August 1998, and became publicly available in September. Now commonly called the Reeves Review or the Reeves Report, after its author, John Reeves QC, it is the product of an expansive (and expensive) review of the federal Land Rights Act that began in October 1997. The main report is 617 pages and a second volume of appendices is 413 pages. It...[Show more]

dc.contributor.editorAltman, Jon
dc.contributor.editorMorphy, Frances
dc.contributor.editorRowse, T
dc.contributor.otherAustralian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research
dc.coverage.spatialAustralia
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-24T01:25:51Z
dc.date.available2018-07-24T01:25:51Z
dc.date.created1999
dc.identifier.issn1036-6962
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/145211
dc.description.abstractBuilding on Land Rights for the Next Generation: Report of the Review of the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976 was completed in August 1998, and became publicly available in September. Now commonly called the Reeves Review or the Reeves Report, after its author, John Reeves QC, it is the product of an expansive (and expensive) review of the federal Land Rights Act that began in October 1997. The main report is 617 pages and a second volume of appendices is 413 pages. It contains many controversial recommendations that, if implemented, would fundamentally change the nature and functioning of land rights legislation in the Northern Territory. There has been a strong and broadly negative reaction by indigenous stakeholders to the review’s public policy and constitutional recommendations. The controversial nature of the Reeves Review has been recognised by the Federal Government. In January 1999 the Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs formally instructed the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs to undertake an inquiry into the Reeves Review. It is anticipated that the Standing Committee will complete its deliberations by late August 1999.
dc.format.extent216 pages
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherCanberra, ACT : Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR), The Australian National University
dc.relation.ispartofseriesResearch Monograph (Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR), The Australian National University); No. 14
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.titleLand Rights at Risk? Evaluations of the Reeves Report
dc.typeBook
local.publisher.urlhttp://caepr.anu.edu.au/
local.type.statusPublished Version
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.description.tableofcontents1. The Reeves Report as public policy / Brian Galligan -- 2. Reeves in the context of the history of land rights legislation: anthropological aspects / Nicolas Peterson -- 3. The Reeves Report and the idea of the ‘region’ / Howard Morphy -- 4. The Reeves Report and the idea of the ‘community’ / Peter Sutton -- 5. The nature of ‘permission’ / Nancy Williams -- 6. Legal issues in implementation of the Reeves Report / Ernst Willheim -- 7. Statehood, land rights and Aboriginal law / Garth Nettheim -- 8. The social, cultural and economic costs and benefits of land rights: an assessment of the Reeves analysis / John Taylor -- 9. The proposed restructure of the financial framework of the Land Rights Act: a critique of Reeves / Jon Altman -- 10. Local organisations and the purpose of money / Robert Levitus -- 11. Delays and uncertainties in the negotiations for mining on Aboriginal land / John Quiggin -- 12. Smaller land councils: value for money? / David Pollack -- 13. The Reeves Report’s assumptions on regionalism and socioeconomic advancement / David Martin -- 14. Municipalising land councils: land rights and local governance / Martin Mowbray -- 15. The Reeves Review and the prospects of a Northern Territory ‘partnership’ / Tim Rowse -- 16. Land rights at risk / Ian Viner -- Contributing authors -- Index
dc.provenancePermission to deposit in Open Research received from CAEPR (ERMS2230079)
CollectionsANU Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (CAEPR)

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