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Interactional use of quotation markers -(ta) nikka/-tay in Korean and -tte in Japanese

Kim, Hyunsu

Description

This thesis examines the interactional functions of three indirect quotative markers, -(ta) nikka and -tay in the Korean language and -tte in the Japanese language in spoken discourse. These markers are typically used in indirect speech to convey the speaker’s own voice and/or a third person’s voice in casual conversations. Previous studies in the literature tend to focus on morpho-syntactic and semantic aspects of these target markers and little attention has been paid to their expressive...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorKim, Hyunsu
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-03T05:24:50Z
dc.date.available2018-07-03T05:24:50Z
dc.identifier.otherb53507290
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/144699
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines the interactional functions of three indirect quotative markers, -(ta) nikka and -tay in the Korean language and -tte in the Japanese language in spoken discourse. These markers are typically used in indirect speech to convey the speaker’s own voice and/or a third person’s voice in casual conversations. Previous studies in the literature tend to focus on morpho-syntactic and semantic aspects of these target markers and little attention has been paid to their expressive meanings, in particular, at the pragmatic/discourse level in the Korean literature. The current study fills up this gap and investigates the meanings beyond the function of indirect quotation of the target markers, as well as sociocultural differences through the comparison of the three markers in the two different languages. Discourse Analysis has been used as a qualitative methodology and the notions of ‘involvement’ and ‘multivoicedness’ have been adopted to describe how speakers employ the target markers to have conversation parties engaged into the ongoing conversation through echoing self-voice and/or the other’s voice in interaction. For the analysis of the data, telephone conversations have been used to identify rich and multiple functions of the target markers in a variety of contexts. The findings from the analysis show that Korean -(ta) nikka and -tay share some similarity of functions with the Japanese -tte. For instance, the functions of Korean -(ta) nikka such as hearer-oriented recollection, speaker-oriented recollection and mutually understood recollection have been found in Japanese -tte as well. Korean -tay also shares the similar functions with Japanese -tte such as a topic initial elicitor, evidence-leaking marker and context-detailing marker. However, the function of face-saving marker is unique to -tte, and this function has not been observed in -(ta) nikka and -tay. It is discussed that this difference between Korean and Japanese in terms of the face-saving function is due to the different cultural values that affect the use of these markers by social members: interaction can be influenced by enryo, meiwaku and omoiyari for the Japanese cultural values, and intimacy, affection and solidarity for the Korean cultural values. Briefly summarised, consideration is a primary concern for Japanese in their interaction, while intimacy is for Koreans. This thesis also discusses that the target markers are used as a particular linguistic strategy by the speaker in verbal exchanges, by revealing their intrinsic nature of being interactional and dialogical, whereby their meanings are constructed in the interactional process. In particular, contexts play an important role, since speakers manipulate contexts when they use the target markers, representing their attitudes toward the content and the interlocutor in different ways. In sum, this thesis gives insight into understanding of how people use language for their communication purposes and how expressive meaning is embedded in language and everyday interactions. Moreover, the findings from this thesis contribute towards better understanding of second or foreign language education and socio-cultural differences in language use in different societies.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectInteractional linguistics
dc.subjecta contrastive study of Korean and Japanese
dc.subjectindirect quotative markers
dc.titleInteractional use of quotation markers -(ta) nikka/-tay in Korean and -tte in Japanese
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorLee, Dunck-Young
local.contributor.supervisorcontactduck.lee@anu.edu.au
dcterms.valid2018
local.description.notesthe author deposited 3/07/2018
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued2016
local.contributor.affiliationSchool of Culture, History and Languages, ANU College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d67b396eabce
local.mintdoimint
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