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Emotion beliefs and cognitive behavioural therapy for social anxiety disorder

De Castella, Krista; Goldin, Philippe; Jazaieri, Hooria; Heimberg, Richard G.; Dweck, Carol S.; Gross, James J.

Description

Despite strong support for the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD), little is known about mechanisms of change in treatment. Within the context of a randomized controlled trial of CBT, this study examined patients' beliefs about the fixed versus malleable nature of anxiety-their 'implicit theories'-as a key variable in CBT for SAD. Compared to waitlist (n = 29; 58% female), CBT (n = 24; 52% female) led to significantly lower levels of fixed beliefs...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDe Castella, Krista
dc.contributor.authorGoldin, Philippe
dc.contributor.authorJazaieri, Hooria
dc.contributor.authorHeimberg, Richard G.
dc.contributor.authorDweck, Carol S.
dc.contributor.authorGross, James J.
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-22T05:25:50Z
dc.date.available2015-07-22T05:25:50Z
dc.identifier.issn1650-6073
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/14383
dc.description.abstractDespite strong support for the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD), little is known about mechanisms of change in treatment. Within the context of a randomized controlled trial of CBT, this study examined patients' beliefs about the fixed versus malleable nature of anxiety-their 'implicit theories'-as a key variable in CBT for SAD. Compared to waitlist (n = 29; 58% female), CBT (n = 24; 52% female) led to significantly lower levels of fixed beliefs about anxiety (Mbaseline = 11.70 vs. MPost = 7.08, d = 1.27). These implicit beliefs indirectly explained CBT-related changes in social anxiety symptoms (κ(2) = .28, [95% CI = 0.12, 0.46]). Implicit beliefs also uniquely predicted treatment outcomes when controlling for baseline social anxiety and other kinds of maladaptive beliefs (perceived social costs, perceived social self-efficacy, and maladaptive interpersonal beliefs). Finally, implicit beliefs continued to predict social anxiety symptoms at 12 months post-treatment. These findings suggest that changes in patients' beliefs about their emotions may play an important role in CBT for SAD.
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis
dc.rights© 2014 Swedish Association for Behaviour Therapy.
dc.sourceCognitive Behaviour Therapy
dc.subjectcbt
dc.subjectbeliefs
dc.subjectemotion
dc.subjectimplicit theories
dc.subjectsocial anxiety
dc.titleEmotion beliefs and cognitive behavioural therapy for social anxiety disorder
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume44
dc.date.issued2014-11-07
local.identifier.absfor091299 - Materials Engineering not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB1907
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.routledge.com/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationDe Castella, K., Research School of Psychology, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1651-2316
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage128
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage141
local.identifier.doi10.1080/16506073.2014.974665
dc.date.updated2015-12-10T11:23:09Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84909952190
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1650-6073/..."author can archive post-print...On institutional repository or subject-based repository after either 12 months embargo" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 27/07/15)
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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