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The evolution of microbialite forms during the Early Triassic transgression: A case study in Chongyang of Hubei Province, South China

Wang, Tan; Burne, Robert; Yuan, Aihua; Wang, Yongbiao; Yi, Zhixing

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The widespread development of microbialites in shallow areas of the Tethys Ocean at the start of the Early Triassic reflects the deterioration of marine ecosystems in the aftermath of the extinction that marked the demise of the majority of Palaeozoic marine faunas. Here we present a study of the evolving microbialite forms and associated biotic assemblages of this pioneering microbialite interval from exposures at Chongyang, Hubei Province, China. This research provides a perspective on the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWang, Tan
dc.contributor.authorBurne, Robert
dc.contributor.authorYuan, Aihua
dc.contributor.authorWang, Yongbiao
dc.contributor.authorYi, Zhixing
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-25T02:03:59Z
dc.identifier.issn0031-0182
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/143609
dc.description.abstractThe widespread development of microbialites in shallow areas of the Tethys Ocean at the start of the Early Triassic reflects the deterioration of marine ecosystems in the aftermath of the extinction that marked the demise of the majority of Palaeozoic marine faunas. Here we present a study of the evolving microbialite forms and associated biotic assemblages of this pioneering microbialite interval from exposures at Chongyang, Hubei Province, China. This research provides a perspective on the effects of eustatic transgression on marine ecosystems as water depths increased at the beginning of Mesozoic, through the study of the changing forms, microfacies and distribution of microbialites. Microbialite forms evolved from stratiform stromatolites to a sequence of tabular thrombolites (with an intercalated layer of columnar stromatolites), followed by domical thrombolites that were overlain, in turn, by oolites. The stratiform stromatolites contain poorly preserved remains of calcified cyanobacteria, but microfossils with chambered structure can also be seen. Metazoan fossils increased from the base of the overlying tabular thrombolite, reflecting increasing biodiversity with deepening of seawater. The occurrence of columnar stromatolites within the tabular thrombolite may indicate a temporary sea-level shallowing. Foraminiferans and other metazoans are absent within the columnar stromatolites, but spherical cyanobacterial remains are extremely abundant. Well-preserved calcified cyanobacteria may reflect an absence of metazoan predation and/or carbonate supersaturation of seawater. As water deepened, domical thrombolites developed and the more complex seafloor relief created varied niches between and within the domes that harboured more ecologically diverse communities. During the process of transgression within the microbialite interval, carbon isotopes exhibit a negative relationship with biodiversity, implying that upwelling of anoxic deep-ocean water, if associated with the negative excursion of carbon isotope values, did not inhibit the diversification of benthic organisms at least on shallow carbonate platforms in the period immediately after the end-Permian mass extinction.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was jointly supported by the National Natural Science Foundationof China (Grants No. 41730320 and No. 41572001) and the 111 project(B08030)
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2018 Elsevier B.V
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.sourcePalaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
dc.subjectStromatolite
dc.subjectThrombolite
dc.subjectMass extinction
dc.subjectTransgression
dc.subjectPalaeoecology
dc.subjectCarbon isotope
dc.titleThe evolution of microbialite forms during the Early Triassic transgression: A case study in Chongyang of Hubei Province, South China
dc.typeJournal article
dc.date.issued2018-02-02
local.identifier.ariespublicationu3102795xPUB813
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationBurne, R. V., Research School of Earth Sciences, The Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.palaeo.2018.01.043
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0031-0182/..."Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of between 24 months" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 25/05/18). This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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