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Authentic fictions: simulation, professionalism and legal learning

Barton, Karen; McKellar, Patricia; Maharg, Paul

Description

Simulation is one of the major applications of the web in education and training as well as entertainment, but has until recently received relatively little attention in higher education. It is becoming increasingly clear that simulations can be used for educational purposes; but one of the key issues affecting such use is the extent to which simulations can be regarded as authentic learning activities. This article explores some of the complex educational and hermeneutic resonances of this...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBarton, Karen
dc.contributor.authorMcKellar, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorMaharg, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-07T05:35:06Z
dc.date.available2015-07-07T05:35:06Z
dc.identifier.issn1079-1159
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/14249
dc.description.abstractSimulation is one of the major applications of the web in education and training as well as entertainment, but has until recently received relatively little attention in higher education. It is becoming increasingly clear that simulations can be used for educational purposes; but one of the key issues affecting such use is the extent to which simulations can be regarded as authentic learning activities. This article explores some of the complex educational and hermeneutic resonances of this phrase. The article then takes as a case study the development, deployment and effects of a simulation upon a professional learning curriculum, the Scottish Diploma in Legal Practice at the Glasgow Graduate School of Law, and the part that authenticity plays in the simulation. The authors also describe the latest iteration of the simulation in the SIMPLE project (SIMulated Professional Learning Environment). A variety of disciplines and a number of sub-areas in law are using the SIMPLE open-source simulation engine in their programs of study, and will be evaluating the results next year. The authors set such simulation activity within a larger technological, educational and ethical context, and argue that when such projects maintain a sense of professional authenticity, it is possible for students to learn effectively and deeply. Finally, the article argues that such projects are essential not only for the future of legal education but for the development of professionalism in most professional disciplines in higher education.
dc.languageen_AUS
dc.publisherNew York University
dc.rightsClinical Law Review.
dc.sourceClinical Law Review
dc.source.urihttp://www.law.nyu.edu/journals/clinicallawreview
dc.subjectauthenticity
dc.subjectlearning
dc.subjecte-learning
dc.subjectlegal learning
dc.subjectsimulation
dc.subjectprofessionalism
dc.subjectimmersive education
dc.subjectvirtual world
dc.titleAuthentic fictions: simulation, professionalism and legal learning
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume14
dc.date.issued2007
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.law.nyu.edu/journals/clinicallawreview
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMaharg, P., College of Law, The Australian National University
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage143
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage193
local.bibliographicCitation.placeofpublicationNew York, N.Y.
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.rights.licensePermission to archive the version granted via email on 10/07/2015
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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