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The investigation of interferences in immunoassay

Ward, Greg; Simpson, Aaron; Boscato, Lyn; Hickman, Peter E.

Description

Immunoassay procedures have a wide application in clinical medicine and as such are used throughout clinical biochemistry laboratories both for urgent and routine testing. Clinicians and laboratory personnel are often presented with immunoassay results which are inconsistent with clinical findings. Without a high index of suspicion interferences will often not be suspected. Artifactual results can be due to a range of interferences in immunoassays which can include cross reacting substances,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWard, Greg
dc.contributor.authorSimpson, Aaron
dc.contributor.authorBoscato, Lyn
dc.contributor.authorHickman, Peter E.
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-05T03:26:56Z
dc.identifier.issn0009-9120
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/139078
dc.description.abstractImmunoassay procedures have a wide application in clinical medicine and as such are used throughout clinical biochemistry laboratories both for urgent and routine testing. Clinicians and laboratory personnel are often presented with immunoassay results which are inconsistent with clinical findings. Without a high index of suspicion interferences will often not be suspected. Artifactual results can be due to a range of interferences in immunoassays which can include cross reacting substances, heterophile antibodies, autoantibodies and the high dose hook effect. Further, pre-analytical aspects and certain disease states can influence the potential for interference in immunoassays. Practical solutions for investigation of artifactual results in the setting of the routine clinical laboratory are provided.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rights© 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists
dc.sourceClinical biochemistry
dc.subjectartifactual results
dc.subjectheterophile
dc.subjecthigh-dose hook
dc.subjectimmunoassay interference
dc.subjectautoantibodies
dc.subjecthumans
dc.subjectimmunoassay
dc.subjectartifacts
dc.subjectclinical laboratory techniques
dc.titleThe investigation of interferences in immunoassay
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume50
dc.date.issued2017-12
local.publisher.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationSimpson, A., Medical School, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationHickman, P. E., Medical School, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1873-2933
local.bibliographicCitation.issue18
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1306
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1311
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clinbiochem.2017.08.015
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0009-9120/..."Author's post-print on open access repository after an embargo period of between 12 months and 48 months" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 4/01/18).
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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