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Testing the generality of the zoom-lens model: Evidence for visual-pathway specific effects of attended-region size on perception

Goodhew, Stephanie Catherine; Lawrence, Rebecca; Edwards, Mark

Description

There are volumes of information available to process in visual scenes. Visual spatial attention is a critically important selection mechanism that prevents these volumes from overwhelming our visual system's limited-capacity processing resources. We were interested in understanding the effect of the size of the attended area on visual perception. The prevailing model of attended-region size across cognition, perception, and neuroscience is the zoom-lens model. This model stipulates that the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGoodhew, Stephanie Catherine
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-18T00:24:44Z
dc.identifier.issn1943-3921
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/138269
dc.description.abstractThere are volumes of information available to process in visual scenes. Visual spatial attention is a critically important selection mechanism that prevents these volumes from overwhelming our visual system's limited-capacity processing resources. We were interested in understanding the effect of the size of the attended area on visual perception. The prevailing model of attended-region size across cognition, perception, and neuroscience is the zoom-lens model. This model stipulates that the magnitude of perceptual processing enhancement is inversely related to the size of the attended region, such that a narrow attended-region facilitates greater perceptual enhancement than a wider region. Yet visual processing is subserved by two major visual pathways (magnocellular and parvocellular) that operate with a degree of independence in early visual processing and encode contrasting visual information. Historically, testing of the zoom-lens has used measures of spatial acuity ideally suited to parvocellular processing. This, therefore, raises questions about the generality of the zoom-lens model to different aspects of visual perception. We found that while a narrow attended-region facilitated spatial acuity and the perception of high spatial frequency targets, it had no impact on either temporal acuity or the perception of low spatial frequency targets. This pattern also held up when targets were not presented centrally. This supports the notion that visual attended-region size has dissociable effects on magnocellular versus parvocellular mediated visual processing.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by an Australian Research Council (ARC) Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DE140101734) awarded to S.C.G. and an ARC Discovery Grant (DP110104553) awarded to M.E
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag
dc.rights© The Psychonomic Society, Inc. 2017. http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1943-3921/..."Author's post-print on any open access repository after 12 months after publication" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 18/12/17).
dc.sourceAttention, perception & psychophysics
dc.subjectattention
dc.subjectmagnocellular
dc.subjectparvocellular
dc.subjectspatial acuity
dc.subjectspatial frequency
dc.subjecttemporal acuity
dc.subjectvisual attention
dc.subjectvisual perception
dc.subjectvisual span
dc.subjectzoom-lens
dc.subjectadolescent
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectattention
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthumans
dc.subjectphotic stimulation
dc.subjectspace perception
dc.subjectvision, ocular
dc.subjectvisual pathways
dc.subjectvisual perception
dc.subjectyoung adult
dc.titleTesting the generality of the zoom-lens model: Evidence for visual-pathway specific effects of attended-region size on perception
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume79
dc.date.issued2017-05
local.publisher.urlhttps://link.springer.com
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationGoodhew, S. C., Research School of Psychology, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationLawrence, R., Research School of Psychology, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationEdwards, E., Research School of Psychology, The Australian National University
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DE140101734
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP110104553
local.identifier.essn1943-393X
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1147
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1164
local.identifier.doi10.3758/s13414-017-1306-9
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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