Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Coming down from the trees: is terrestrial activity in Bornean orangutans natural or disturbance driven?

Ancrenaz, Marc; Sollmann, Rahel; Meijaard, Erik; Hearn, Andrew J.; Ross, Joanna; Samejima, Hiromitsu; Loken, Brent; Cheyne, Susan M.; Stark, Danica J.; Gardner, Penny C.; Goossens, Benoit; Mohamed, Azlan; Bohm, Torsten; Matsuda, Ikki; Nakabayasi, Miyabi; Lee, Shan Khee; Bernard, Henry; Brodie, Jedediah; Wich, Serge; Fredriksson, Gabriella; Hanya, Goro; Harrison, Mark E.; Kanamori, Tomoko; Kretzschmar, Petra; Macdonald, David W.; Riger, Peter; Spehar, Stephanie; Ambu, Laurentius N.; Wilting, Andreas

Description

The orangutan is the world's largest arboreal mammal, and images of the red ape moving through the tropical forest canopy symbolise its typical arboreal behaviour. Records of terrestrial behaviour are scarce and often associated with habitat disturbance. We conducted a large-scale species-level analysis of ground-based camera-trapping data to evaluate the extent to which Bornean orangutans Pongo pygmaeus come down from the trees to travel terrestrially, and whether they are indeed forced to the...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorAncrenaz, Marc
dc.contributor.authorSollmann, Rahel
dc.contributor.authorMeijaard, Erik
dc.contributor.authorHearn, Andrew J.
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Joanna
dc.contributor.authorSamejima, Hiromitsu
dc.contributor.authorLoken, Brent
dc.contributor.authorCheyne, Susan M.
dc.contributor.authorStark, Danica J.
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Penny C.
dc.contributor.authorGoossens, Benoit
dc.contributor.authorMohamed, Azlan
dc.contributor.authorBohm, Torsten
dc.contributor.authorMatsuda, Ikki
dc.contributor.authorNakabayasi, Miyabi
dc.contributor.authorLee, Shan Khee
dc.contributor.authorBernard, Henry
dc.contributor.authorBrodie, Jedediah
dc.contributor.authorWich, Serge
dc.contributor.authorFredriksson, Gabriella
dc.contributor.authorHanya, Goro
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Mark E.
dc.contributor.authorKanamori, Tomoko
dc.contributor.authorKretzschmar, Petra
dc.contributor.authorMacdonald, David W.
dc.contributor.authorRiger, Peter
dc.contributor.authorSpehar, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorAmbu, Laurentius N.
dc.contributor.authorWilting, Andreas
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-25T05:04:53Z
dc.date.available2015-05-25T05:04:53Z
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/13579
dc.description.abstractThe orangutan is the world's largest arboreal mammal, and images of the red ape moving through the tropical forest canopy symbolise its typical arboreal behaviour. Records of terrestrial behaviour are scarce and often associated with habitat disturbance. We conducted a large-scale species-level analysis of ground-based camera-trapping data to evaluate the extent to which Bornean orangutans Pongo pygmaeus come down from the trees to travel terrestrially, and whether they are indeed forced to the ground primarily by anthropogenic forest disturbances. Although the degree of forest disturbance and canopy gap size influenced terrestriality, orangutans were recorded on the ground as frequently in heavily degraded habitats as in primary forests. Furthermore, all age-sex classes were recorded on the ground (flanged males more often). This suggests that terrestrial locomotion is part of the Bornean orangutan's natural behavioural repertoire to a much greater extent than previously thought, and is only modified by habitat disturbance. The capacity of orangutans to come down from the trees may increase their ability to cope with at least smaller-scale forest fragmentation, and to cross moderately open spaces in mosaic landscapes, although the extent of this versatility remains to be investigated.
dc.format5 pages
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.rights© 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
dc.sourceScientific Reports
dc.titleComing down from the trees: is terrestrial activity in Bornean orangutans natural or disturbance driven?
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume4
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-01-16
dc.date.issued2014-02-13
local.identifier.absfor160100 - ANTHROPOLOGY
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB3007
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.nature.com/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMeijaard, E., School for Archaeology and Anthropology, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn2045-2322
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage4024
local.identifier.doi10.1038/srep04024
dc.date.updated2018-11-29T08:13:55Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84925641164
local.identifier.thomsonID000331290800001
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
Ancrenaz et al Coming Down From the Trees 2014.pdf328.62 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator