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Translating physiological signals to changes in feeding behaviour in mammals and the future effects of global climate change

Moore, Ben D.; Wiggins, Natasha L.; Marsh, Karen J.; Dearing, M. Denise; Foley, William J.

Description

Mammals cannot avoid ingesting secondary metabolites, often in significant amounts. Thus, their intake must be regulated to avoid intoxication. Three broad mechanisms have been described by which this can be achieved. These are conditioned aversions mediated by nausea, non-conditioned aversions and the recognition of limits to detoxification. Although there is some overlap between these, we know little about the way that mechanisms of toxin avoidance interact with regulation of nutrient...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMoore, Ben D.
dc.contributor.authorWiggins, Natasha L.
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, Karen J.
dc.contributor.authorDearing, M. Denise
dc.contributor.authorFoley, William J.
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-13T02:52:31Z
dc.date.available2015-05-13T02:52:31Z
dc.identifier.issn1836-0939
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/13458
dc.description.abstractMammals cannot avoid ingesting secondary metabolites, often in significant amounts. Thus, their intake must be regulated to avoid intoxication. Three broad mechanisms have been described by which this can be achieved. These are conditioned aversions mediated by nausea, non-conditioned aversions and the recognition of limits to detoxification. Although there is some overlap between these, we know little about the way that mechanisms of toxin avoidance interact with regulation of nutrient intake and whether one has priority over the other. Nonetheless, regulation of meal length and inter-meal length allows the intake of some plant secondary metabolites to be matched with an animal’s capacity for detoxification and its nutritional requirements. Toxicity itself is not a fixed limitation and recent work suggests that ambient temperature can be a major determinant of the toxicity of plant secondary metabolites, largely through effects on liver function. These effects are likely to be of major importance in predicting the impact of global climate change on herbivores.
dc.description.sponsorshipDr Olivier Bonnet and Dr Paulo Carvalho. BDM, KJM MDD and WJF are supported by grants from the Australian Research Council (DP140100228; DE120101263) and MDD also by the National Science Foundation (DEB 1342615).
dc.format12 pages
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.rights© CSIRO 2015
dc.sourceAnimal Production Science
dc.subjectconditioned aversions
dc.subjectdiet selection
dc.subjectheat dissipation limit hypothesis
dc.subjectherbivore
dc.subjectplant secondary metabolites
dc.subjecttemperature-dependent toxicity
dc.titleTranslating physiological signals to changes in feeding behaviour in mammals and the future effects of global climate change
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume55
dcterms.dateAccepted2015
dc.date.issued2015
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.publish.csiro.au/
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMarsh, Karen J., Division of Evolution, Ecology & Genetics, CMBE Research School of Biology, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationFoley, William J., Division of Evolution, Ecology & Genetics, CMBE Research School of Biology, The Australian National University
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP140100228
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DE120101263
local.identifier.essn1836-5787
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage272
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage283
local.identifier.doi10.1071/AN14487
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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