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Geographic range shifts do not erase the historic signal of speciation in mammals

Cardillo, Marcel

Description

Many evolutionary analyses assume that the positions of species geographic ranges are sufficiently phylogenetically conserved that current ranges reflect ancestral ranges and retain the historic signal of speciation. The validity of this assumption has been challenged, because there is evidence that ranges can shift rapidly and extensively. Here I test the assumption of range conservatism using simulations and empirical tests of phylogenetic signal in geographic positions of ranges within...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCardillo, Marcel
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T01:58:47Z
dc.identifier.issn0003-0147
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/13370
dc.description.abstractMany evolutionary analyses assume that the positions of species geographic ranges are sufficiently phylogenetically conserved that current ranges reflect ancestral ranges and retain the historic signal of speciation. The validity of this assumption has been challenged, because there is evidence that ranges can shift rapidly and extensively. Here I test the assumption of range conservatism using simulations and empirical tests of phylogenetic signal in geographic positions of ranges within mammal orders, families, and genera. In most taxa, range positions show strong phylogenetic signal, quantified using Pagel's λ, Mantel tests, and a novel method to measure phylogenetic signal near the tips of a phylogeny. Taxa with highly labile range positions are exceptions to the general pattern and include very young groups such as Sciurus that may still be in the early, rapid-expansion phase of adaptive radiation. In two orders containing many species with large distributions (Artiodactyla and Carnivora), temporal patterns of range evolution are consistent with large instantaneous shifts in range position associated with allopatric speciation. In most other taxa, range evolution is better described by models that allow ranges to evolve along branches of the phylogeny. The results point to a common pattern of phylogenetically conserved ranges where the current position of species ranges reflects their position at the time of speciation, modified by gradual drift of range boundaries through time.
dc.description.sponsorshipI am supported by the Research School of Biology, Australian National University.
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Press
dc.sourceThe American Naturalist
dc.subjectGeographic distributions
dc.subjectPhylogenetic conservatism
dc.subjectPhylogenetic signal
dc.subjectEvolutionary biology
dc.subjectGeographical distribution
dc.subjectGeographical region
dc.subjectMammal
dc.subjectRange expansion
dc.subjectArtiodactyla
dc.subjectCarnivora
dc.titleGeographic range shifts do not erase the historic signal of speciation in mammals
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume185
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-11-10
dc.date.issued2015-01-28
local.identifier.absfor060200 - ECOLOGY
local.identifier.absfor060300 - EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY
local.identifier.absfor060800 - ZOOLOGY
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB1026
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCardillo, Marcel, Division of Evolution, Ecology & Genetics, CMBE Research School of Biology, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1537-5323
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage343
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage353
local.identifier.doi10.1086/679663
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2015-12-10T09:50:23Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84922723238
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://www.press.uchicago.edu/infoServices/open.html Authors may deposit either the published PDF of their article or the final accepted version of the manuscript after peer review (but not proofs of the article) in a non-commercial repository where it can be made freely available no sooner than twelve (12) months after publication of the article in the journal.
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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