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Transference and social categorisation

Frain, Andrew James

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Transference and social categorisation Abstract: This thesis concerns transference as a social psychological phenomenon, where transference has come to mean inferring that further characteristics of a significant other are present in a newly encountered target person after some observation of shared characteristics between those two figures. This thesis argues for the adoption of a social categorisation based approach to transference that is heavily informed...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFrain, Andrew James
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-15T01:38:31Z
dc.date.available2017-11-15T01:38:31Z
dc.identifier.otherb47393361
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/133662
dc.description.abstractTransference and social categorisation Abstract: This thesis concerns transference as a social psychological phenomenon, where transference has come to mean inferring that further characteristics of a significant other are present in a newly encountered target person after some observation of shared characteristics between those two figures. This thesis argues for the adoption of a social categorisation based approach to transference that is heavily informed by the social identity approach, and self-categorisation theory in particular. This approach is contrasted with the social cognitive model of transference, which is currently the dominant theoretical account of transference in social psychology. In terms of the empirical contribution of this thesis, three studies are reported that each attempt to test the predictive advantages of a proposed social categorisation model of transference. Study 1 leverages the social identity approach concept of comparative fit and consequently tests whether the characteristics of other people in the perceiver’s frame of reference (i.e., in addition to the target of transference) can moderate the extent of transference. Study 2 and Study 3 leverage the social identity approach concept of perceiver readiness and test whether the current goals of the perceiver can moderate the extent of transference. Study 3 also seeks to test whether the current goals of the perceiver can moderate the content of transference. Although the results of neither Study 1 or Study 2 conform to predictions, the results of Study 3 provide initial support for the utility of a social identity based understanding of transference. Possible future empirical directions for a social categorical account of transference are explored, as are the theoretical and practical implications, with particular attention paid to the implications for clinical practice. Overall a social categorisation approach to transference is shown to have some predictive advantages, in addition to providing advantages in terms of theoretical and metatheoretical coherence.
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectSocial identity
dc.subjectsocial categorisation
dc.subjectself-categorization theory
dc.subjecttransference
dc.subjectsocial cognition
dc.subjectobjectivist
dc.subjectsocial constructionist
dc.titleTransference and social categorisation
dc.typeThesis (PhD)
local.contributor.supervisorVan Rooy, Dirk
local.contributor.supervisorcontactdirk.vanrooy@anu.edu.au
dcterms.valid2017
local.description.notesthe author deposited 15/11/2017
local.type.degreeDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
dc.date.issued2016
local.contributor.affiliationResearch School of Psychology, The Australian National University
local.identifier.doi10.25911/5d70f0be90476
local.mintdoimint
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