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Avifauna and urban encroachment in time and space

Rayner, Laura; Ikin, Karen; Evans, Maldwyn J.; Gibbons, Philip; Manning, Adrian D.; Lindenmayer, David B

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AIM: Urban expansion significantly alters fringe environments often with unde-sirable impacts on biodiversity. Consequently, there is a need to define clearconservation objectives for areas subject to urban encroachment. Urban fringe development is a highly dynamic process, both spatially and temporally, but few studies are equipped to examine its temporal effects on biota. We aimed to explore the impacts of urban encroachment on avifauna through space and time.LOCATION: The Australian Capital...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorRayner, Laura
dc.contributor.authorIkin, Karen
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Maldwyn J.
dc.contributor.authorGibbons, Philip
dc.contributor.authorManning, Adrian D.
dc.contributor.authorLindenmayer, David B
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-17T04:49:16Z
dc.date.available2015-04-17T04:49:16Z
dc.identifier.citationRayner, L. , Ikin, K. , Evans, M. J., Gibbons, P. , Lindenmayer, D. B., Manning, A. D. and Bradley, B. (2015), Avifauna and urban encroachment in time and space. Diversity Distrib., 21: 428-440. doi:10.1111/ddi.12293
dc.identifier.issn1366-9516
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/13279
dc.description.abstractAIM: Urban expansion significantly alters fringe environments often with unde-sirable impacts on biodiversity. Consequently, there is a need to define clearconservation objectives for areas subject to urban encroachment. Urban fringe development is a highly dynamic process, both spatially and temporally, but few studies are equipped to examine its temporal effects on biota. We aimed to explore the impacts of urban encroachment on avifauna through space and time.LOCATION: The Australian Capital Territory, Australia. METHODS: We used records from an extensive 14-year monitoring programme undertaken in temperate woodland. We fitted hierarchical generalized linear models to assess individual species responses to the distance from monitoring sites to the urban boundary, and the temporal rate of change in this distance through time. We used factorial analysis on mixed data to examine trait group responses to these predictors.RESULTS: Our results indicated that the occurrence of approximately half of the study region’s avifauna is strongly linked to the proximity of their habitat to the urban fringe, but that the impact of urban fringe development on the occurrence of some species changed through time. We identified several species of conservation concern that respond negatively to large annual increases in urban fringe development, irrespective of its proximity to suitable habitat. Species responses to urban proximity were linked to life history traits, with small,migratory, woodland-dependent species that rely on mid- and upper-canopy structures, clearly disadvantaged by urban environments.MAIN CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate the breadth of species responses to urban encroachment over much larger distances than is typically investigated in urban ecological studies. We identify guilds vulnerable to the impacts of urban fringe development and therefore in need of ecologically sensitive urban design. We argue that future urban expansion towards important fringe habitats will need to be planned strategically through space and time.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research received funding support from Conservation Planning and Research, Environment and Sustainable Devel-opment Directorate ACT Government and the Fenner Schoolof Environment and Society. DBL, PG and KI were sup-ported by the National Environmental Research Program. ADM was supported by an ARC Future Fellowship (FT100100358).
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherWiley
dc.sourceDiversity and Distributions
dc.subjectAustralian birds
dc.subjectbiodiversity
dc.subjectconservation
dc.subjectprotected areas
dc.subjecturbanization
dc.subjectwoodland
dc.titleAvifauna and urban encroachment in time and space
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume21
dc.date.issued2015-04
local.identifier.absfor050104 - Landscape Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4224061xPUB53
local.publisher.urlhttp://au.wiley.com/WileyCDA/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationRayner, L., Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationIkin, K., Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationLindenmayer, D. B., Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationManning, A. D., Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/FT100100358
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage428
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage440
local.identifier.doi10.1111/ddi.12293
local.identifier.absseo961310 - Remnant Vegetation and Protected Conservation Areas in Urban and Industrial Environments
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T03:43:42Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84920177446
dc.provenanceSherpa/Romeo - Author's Pre-print: author can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing) Author's Post-print: subject to Restrictions below, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) Restrictions: 12 months embargo Publisher's Version/PD)F: author cannot archive publisher's /version/PDF (viewed /
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