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Transforming food systems through food sovereignty: an Australian urban context

Davila, Federico; Dyball, Robert

Description

This article draws on La Via Campesina's definition of food sovereignty and its potential for reconceptualising food as a basic human right within the dominant Australian food discourse. We argue that the educative value that emerges from urban food production in Australia stems from the action of growing food and its capacity to transform individuals’ social and environmental concerns over food systems. Community participation in urban food production can promote a learning process that...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDavila, Federico
dc.contributor.authorDyball, Robert
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-16T22:39:34Z
dc.date.available2015-03-16T22:39:34Z
dc.identifier.issn0814-0626
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/12953
dc.description.abstractThis article draws on La Via Campesina's definition of food sovereignty and its potential for reconceptualising food as a basic human right within the dominant Australian food discourse. We argue that the educative value that emerges from urban food production in Australia stems from the action of growing food and its capacity to transform individuals’ social and environmental concerns over food systems. Community participation in urban food production can promote a learning process that generates political understanding and concerns over food systems. We use the education theories of transformative learning and critical consciousness to discuss how Australian urban food production systems can create this social and environmental support for alternative food systems. By having control over food production practices and building collective understandings of how food choices impact global food systems, elements of food sovereignty can develop in an Australian urban context.
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.rights© 2015 The Author(s)
dc.sourceAustralian Journal of Environmental Education
dc.titleTransforming food systems through food sovereignty: an Australian urban context
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolumeOnline Early Version
dc.date.issued2015-02-23
local.identifier.absfor130202 - Curriculum and Pedagogy Theory and Development
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9903927xPUB14
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.cambridge.org/aus/
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationDavila, F., Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University
local.contributor.affiliationDyball, R., Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage12
local.identifier.doi10.1017/aee.2015.14
local.identifier.absseo930501 - Education and Training Systems Policies and Development
dc.date.updated2015-12-08T03:05:43Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84923294843
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/0814-0626/..."Author's post-print on author's personal website, departmental website, institutional repository, non-commercial subject-based repositories, such as PubMed Central, Europe PMC or arXiv, on acceptance of publication" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 23/03/15)
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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