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‘Catching chlamydia’: combining cash incentives and community pharmacy access for increased chlamydia screening, the view of young people

Parker, Rhian M.; Bell, Allison; Currie, Marian J.; Deeks, Louise S.; Cooper, Gabrielle; Martin, Sarah J.; Del Rosario, Rendry; Hocking, Jane S.; Bowden, Francis

Description

In Australia and elsewhere, chlamydia screening rates for those aged between 16 and 30 years continue to be low. Innovative, age-appropriate approaches are necessary to increase chlamydia screening among this target group to prevent short- and long-term consequences of the infection such as pelvic inflammatory disease, chronic pelvic pain, ectopic pregnancy and infertility. Studies have demonstrated that offering chlamydia screening in community pharmacies may be a useful adjunct to current...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorParker, Rhian M.
dc.contributor.authorBell, Allison
dc.contributor.authorCurrie, Marian J.
dc.contributor.authorDeeks, Louise S.
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Gabrielle
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Sarah J.
dc.contributor.authorDel Rosario, Rendry
dc.contributor.authorHocking, Jane S.
dc.contributor.authorBowden, Francis
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-16T01:12:38Z
dc.date.available2015-03-16T01:12:38Z
dc.identifier.issn1448-7527
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/12945
dc.description.abstractIn Australia and elsewhere, chlamydia screening rates for those aged between 16 and 30 years continue to be low. Innovative, age-appropriate approaches are necessary to increase chlamydia screening among this target group to prevent short- and long-term consequences of the infection such as pelvic inflammatory disease, chronic pelvic pain, ectopic pregnancy and infertility. Studies have demonstrated that offering chlamydia screening in community pharmacies may be a useful adjunct to current screening services. Approximately 90% of Australians visit a pharmacy at least once a year. Chlamydia screening and education in community pharmacies with remuneration may provide another option for opportunistic testing as part of a national chlamydia screening scheme. Compensation is an accepted practice in the field of research and has been demonstrated to improve adherence to health promotion activities. In 2011, a cross-sectional study of community pharmacy-based chlamydia screening offered in conjunction with an A$10 cash incentive to participate was conducted in the Australian Capital Territory. As part of this study young people were asked about their experience of, and views about, pharmacy-based chlamydia screening. The views of consented participants were collected using the one-page questionnaire consisting of 10 closed questions and one open-ended question. Participants completed the questionnaire when they returned their urine sample and before being given the cash incentive. Overall participants were highly satisfied with the pharmacy-based chlamydia screening service. Over 60% of questionnaire respondents felt that the payment did affect their decision to have the chlamydia test, and 23% stated that it made no difference. Young people reported that pharmacy-based screening is acceptable and convenient. Accessibility and the small cash incentive played significant roles in increasing participation
dc.format5 pages
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.rights© CSIRO Publishing
dc.sourceAustralian Journal of Primary Health
dc.subjectchlamydia screening rates
dc.subjectAustralia
dc.subjectbetween 16 and 30 years
dc.subjectprevent short- and long-term consequences
dc.subjectpharmacy-based screening
dc.subjectpelvic inflammatory disease
dc.subjectchronic pelvic pain
dc.subjectectopic pregnancy
dc.subjectinfertility
dc.title‘Catching chlamydia’: combining cash incentives and community pharmacy access for increased chlamydia screening, the view of young people
dc.typeJournal article
local.identifier.citationvolume21
dcterms.dateAccepted2013-08-05
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor111717 - Primary Health Care
local.identifier.absfor110309 - Infectious Diseases
local.identifier.absfor111500 - PHARMACOLOGY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4971216xPUB257
local.publisher.urlhttp://www.publish.csiro.au/
local.type.statusPublished version
local.contributor.affiliationBell, Allison, B Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute, The Australian National University
local.identifier.essn1836-7399
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage79
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage83
local.identifier.doi10.1071/PY12135
dc.date.updated2015-12-09T09:09:23Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84923218987
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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